Dietary fat subgroups, zinc, and vegetable components are related to urine F2a-isoprostane concentration, a measure of oxidative stress, in midlife women

Kristin M. Tomey, MaryFran R. Sowers, Xizhao Li, Daniel S. McConnell, Sybil Crawford, Ellen B Gold, Bill Lasley, John F. Randolph

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Abstract

Smoking, diet, and physical activity may impact chronic diseases in part by promoting or attenuating oxidative stress. We evaluated associations between lifestyle factors and urine F2a-isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative stress in 1610 participants of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). Dietary intake and physical activity were assessed at baseline and the 5th year 05 (Y05). These data were related to Y05 urinary F2a-isoprostane concentration with regression analyses. Median urine F2a-isoprostane concentration was 433 ng/L overall, 917 ng/L in smokers [inter-quartile range (IQR): 467, 1832 ng/L], and 403 ng/L in nonsmokers (IQR: 228, 709 ng/L; P < 0.0001 for difference). Higher trans fat intake was associated with higher urine F2a-isoprostane concentration; partial Spearman correlations (ρx|y) between Y05 urine F2a-isoprostane concentration and trans fatty acids was 0.19 (P = 0.03) in smokers and 0.13 (P < 0.0001) in nonsmokers. Increased log trans fat intake from baseline to Y05 was associated with higher concentration of log urine F2a-isoprostanes in nonsmokers (β = 0.131, SE = 0.04, P = 0.0003). In nonsmokers, the partial correlation (ρx|y) between lutein and urine F2a- isoprostane concentration was -0.13 (P < 0.0001). Increased intake of log lutein from baseline to Y05 was also associated with lower log urine F 2a-isoprostane concentration (β = -0.096, SE = 0.03, P = 0.0005) in nonsmokers. Increased zinc intake from baseline to Y05 was associated with lower log urine F2a-isoprostane concentration in smokers and nonsmokers (β = -0.346, SE = 0.14, P = 0.01), and -0.117, 0.04 (P = 0.001), respectively]. In conclusion, diet (fat subtypes, zinc, and vegetable components) and smoking were associated with urine F2a-isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2412-2419
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume137
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 2007

Fingerprint

Isoprostanes
Dietary Fats
dietary fat
Vegetables
Zinc
Oxidative Stress
oxidative stress
urine
zinc
vegetables
Urine
Lutein
smoking (food products)
fat intake
Fats
lutein
physical activity
Smoking
women's health
Exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Dietary fat subgroups, zinc, and vegetable components are related to urine F2a-isoprostane concentration, a measure of oxidative stress, in midlife women. / Tomey, Kristin M.; Sowers, MaryFran R.; Li, Xizhao; McConnell, Daniel S.; Crawford, Sybil; Gold, Ellen B; Lasley, Bill; Randolph, John F.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 137, No. 11, 11.2007, p. 2412-2419.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tomey, KM, Sowers, MR, Li, X, McConnell, DS, Crawford, S, Gold, EB, Lasley, B & Randolph, JF 2007, 'Dietary fat subgroups, zinc, and vegetable components are related to urine F2a-isoprostane concentration, a measure of oxidative stress, in midlife women', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 137, no. 11, pp. 2412-2419.
Tomey, Kristin M. ; Sowers, MaryFran R. ; Li, Xizhao ; McConnell, Daniel S. ; Crawford, Sybil ; Gold, Ellen B ; Lasley, Bill ; Randolph, John F. / Dietary fat subgroups, zinc, and vegetable components are related to urine F2a-isoprostane concentration, a measure of oxidative stress, in midlife women. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2007 ; Vol. 137, No. 11. pp. 2412-2419.
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title = "Dietary fat subgroups, zinc, and vegetable components are related to urine F2a-isoprostane concentration, a measure of oxidative stress, in midlife women",
abstract = "Smoking, diet, and physical activity may impact chronic diseases in part by promoting or attenuating oxidative stress. We evaluated associations between lifestyle factors and urine F2a-isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative stress in 1610 participants of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). Dietary intake and physical activity were assessed at baseline and the 5th year 05 (Y05). These data were related to Y05 urinary F2a-isoprostane concentration with regression analyses. Median urine F2a-isoprostane concentration was 433 ng/L overall, 917 ng/L in smokers [inter-quartile range (IQR): 467, 1832 ng/L], and 403 ng/L in nonsmokers (IQR: 228, 709 ng/L; P < 0.0001 for difference). Higher trans fat intake was associated with higher urine F2a-isoprostane concentration; partial Spearman correlations (ρx|y) between Y05 urine F2a-isoprostane concentration and trans fatty acids was 0.19 (P = 0.03) in smokers and 0.13 (P < 0.0001) in nonsmokers. Increased log trans fat intake from baseline to Y05 was associated with higher concentration of log urine F2a-isoprostanes in nonsmokers (β = 0.131, SE = 0.04, P = 0.0003). In nonsmokers, the partial correlation (ρx|y) between lutein and urine F2a- isoprostane concentration was -0.13 (P < 0.0001). Increased intake of log lutein from baseline to Y05 was also associated with lower log urine F 2a-isoprostane concentration (β = -0.096, SE = 0.03, P = 0.0005) in nonsmokers. Increased zinc intake from baseline to Y05 was associated with lower log urine F2a-isoprostane concentration in smokers and nonsmokers (β = -0.346, SE = 0.14, P = 0.01), and -0.117, 0.04 (P = 0.001), respectively]. In conclusion, diet (fat subtypes, zinc, and vegetable components) and smoking were associated with urine F2a-isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative stress.",
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T1 - Dietary fat subgroups, zinc, and vegetable components are related to urine F2a-isoprostane concentration, a measure of oxidative stress, in midlife women

AU - Tomey, Kristin M.

AU - Sowers, MaryFran R.

AU - Li, Xizhao

AU - McConnell, Daniel S.

AU - Crawford, Sybil

AU - Gold, Ellen B

AU - Lasley, Bill

AU - Randolph, John F.

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N2 - Smoking, diet, and physical activity may impact chronic diseases in part by promoting or attenuating oxidative stress. We evaluated associations between lifestyle factors and urine F2a-isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative stress in 1610 participants of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). Dietary intake and physical activity were assessed at baseline and the 5th year 05 (Y05). These data were related to Y05 urinary F2a-isoprostane concentration with regression analyses. Median urine F2a-isoprostane concentration was 433 ng/L overall, 917 ng/L in smokers [inter-quartile range (IQR): 467, 1832 ng/L], and 403 ng/L in nonsmokers (IQR: 228, 709 ng/L; P < 0.0001 for difference). Higher trans fat intake was associated with higher urine F2a-isoprostane concentration; partial Spearman correlations (ρx|y) between Y05 urine F2a-isoprostane concentration and trans fatty acids was 0.19 (P = 0.03) in smokers and 0.13 (P < 0.0001) in nonsmokers. Increased log trans fat intake from baseline to Y05 was associated with higher concentration of log urine F2a-isoprostanes in nonsmokers (β = 0.131, SE = 0.04, P = 0.0003). In nonsmokers, the partial correlation (ρx|y) between lutein and urine F2a- isoprostane concentration was -0.13 (P < 0.0001). Increased intake of log lutein from baseline to Y05 was also associated with lower log urine F 2a-isoprostane concentration (β = -0.096, SE = 0.03, P = 0.0005) in nonsmokers. Increased zinc intake from baseline to Y05 was associated with lower log urine F2a-isoprostane concentration in smokers and nonsmokers (β = -0.346, SE = 0.14, P = 0.01), and -0.117, 0.04 (P = 0.001), respectively]. In conclusion, diet (fat subtypes, zinc, and vegetable components) and smoking were associated with urine F2a-isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative stress.

AB - Smoking, diet, and physical activity may impact chronic diseases in part by promoting or attenuating oxidative stress. We evaluated associations between lifestyle factors and urine F2a-isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative stress in 1610 participants of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). Dietary intake and physical activity were assessed at baseline and the 5th year 05 (Y05). These data were related to Y05 urinary F2a-isoprostane concentration with regression analyses. Median urine F2a-isoprostane concentration was 433 ng/L overall, 917 ng/L in smokers [inter-quartile range (IQR): 467, 1832 ng/L], and 403 ng/L in nonsmokers (IQR: 228, 709 ng/L; P < 0.0001 for difference). Higher trans fat intake was associated with higher urine F2a-isoprostane concentration; partial Spearman correlations (ρx|y) between Y05 urine F2a-isoprostane concentration and trans fatty acids was 0.19 (P = 0.03) in smokers and 0.13 (P < 0.0001) in nonsmokers. Increased log trans fat intake from baseline to Y05 was associated with higher concentration of log urine F2a-isoprostanes in nonsmokers (β = 0.131, SE = 0.04, P = 0.0003). In nonsmokers, the partial correlation (ρx|y) between lutein and urine F2a- isoprostane concentration was -0.13 (P < 0.0001). Increased intake of log lutein from baseline to Y05 was also associated with lower log urine F 2a-isoprostane concentration (β = -0.096, SE = 0.03, P = 0.0005) in nonsmokers. Increased zinc intake from baseline to Y05 was associated with lower log urine F2a-isoprostane concentration in smokers and nonsmokers (β = -0.346, SE = 0.14, P = 0.01), and -0.117, 0.04 (P = 0.001), respectively]. In conclusion, diet (fat subtypes, zinc, and vegetable components) and smoking were associated with urine F2a-isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative stress.

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