Diet Quality and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Postmenopausal Women With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Women's Health Initiative

Kristin M. Hirahatake, Luohua Jiang, Nathan D. Wong, James M. Shikany, Charles B. Eaton, Matthew A. Allison, Lisa Martin, Lorena Garcia, Oleg Zaslavsky, Andrew O. Odegaard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Dietary patterns are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in the general population, but diet-CVD association in populations with diabetes mellitus is limited. Our objective was to examine the association between diet quality and CVD risk in a population with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results We analyzed prospective data from 5809 women with prevalent type 2 diabetes mellitus at baseline from the Women's Health Initiative. Diet quality was defined using alternate Mediterranean, Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension, Paleolithic, and American Diabetes Association dietary pattern scores calculated from a validated food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable Cox's proportional hazard regression was used to analyze the risk of incident CVD. During mean 12.4 years of follow-up, 1454 (25%) incident CVD cases were documented. Women with higher alternate Mediterranean, Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension, and American Diabetes Association dietary pattern scores had a lower risk of CVD compared with women with lower scores (Q5 v Q1) (hazard ratio [HR]aMed 0.77, 95% CI 0.65-0.93; HRDASH 0.69, 95% CI 0.58-0.83; HRADA 0.71, 95% CI 0.59-0.86). No association was observed between the Paleolithic score and CVD risk. Conclusions Dietary patterns that emphasize higher intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts/seeds, legumes, a high unsaturated:saturated fat ratio, and lower intake of red and processed meats, added sugars, and sodium are associated with lower CVD risk in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e013249
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume8
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Fingerprint

Women's Health
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Cardiovascular Diseases
Diet
Unsaturated Fats
Population
Hypertension
Nuts
Fabaceae
Vegetables
Fruit
Seeds
Diabetes Mellitus
Sodium
Food

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease prevention
  • diabetes mellitus
  • diet
  • nutrition
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Diet Quality and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Postmenopausal Women With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus : The Women's Health Initiative. / Hirahatake, Kristin M.; Jiang, Luohua; Wong, Nathan D.; Shikany, James M.; Eaton, Charles B.; Allison, Matthew A.; Martin, Lisa; Garcia, Lorena; Zaslavsky, Oleg; Odegaard, Andrew O.

In: Journal of the American Heart Association, Vol. 8, No. 19, 01.10.2019, p. e013249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hirahatake, KM, Jiang, L, Wong, ND, Shikany, JM, Eaton, CB, Allison, MA, Martin, L, Garcia, L, Zaslavsky, O & Odegaard, AO 2019, 'Diet Quality and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Postmenopausal Women With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Women's Health Initiative', Journal of the American Heart Association, vol. 8, no. 19, pp. e013249. https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.119.013249
Hirahatake, Kristin M. ; Jiang, Luohua ; Wong, Nathan D. ; Shikany, James M. ; Eaton, Charles B. ; Allison, Matthew A. ; Martin, Lisa ; Garcia, Lorena ; Zaslavsky, Oleg ; Odegaard, Andrew O. / Diet Quality and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Postmenopausal Women With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus : The Women's Health Initiative. In: Journal of the American Heart Association. 2019 ; Vol. 8, No. 19. pp. e013249.
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abstract = "Background Dietary patterns are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in the general population, but diet-CVD association in populations with diabetes mellitus is limited. Our objective was to examine the association between diet quality and CVD risk in a population with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results We analyzed prospective data from 5809 women with prevalent type 2 diabetes mellitus at baseline from the Women's Health Initiative. Diet quality was defined using alternate Mediterranean, Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension, Paleolithic, and American Diabetes Association dietary pattern scores calculated from a validated food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable Cox's proportional hazard regression was used to analyze the risk of incident CVD. During mean 12.4 years of follow-up, 1454 (25{\%}) incident CVD cases were documented. Women with higher alternate Mediterranean, Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension, and American Diabetes Association dietary pattern scores had a lower risk of CVD compared with women with lower scores (Q5 v Q1) (hazard ratio [HR]aMed 0.77, 95{\%} CI 0.65-0.93; HRDASH 0.69, 95{\%} CI 0.58-0.83; HRADA 0.71, 95{\%} CI 0.59-0.86). No association was observed between the Paleolithic score and CVD risk. Conclusions Dietary patterns that emphasize higher intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts/seeds, legumes, a high unsaturated:saturated fat ratio, and lower intake of red and processed meats, added sugars, and sodium are associated with lower CVD risk in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus.",
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T2 - The Women's Health Initiative

AU - Hirahatake, Kristin M.

AU - Jiang, Luohua

AU - Wong, Nathan D.

AU - Shikany, James M.

AU - Eaton, Charles B.

AU - Allison, Matthew A.

AU - Martin, Lisa

AU - Garcia, Lorena

AU - Zaslavsky, Oleg

AU - Odegaard, Andrew O.

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N2 - Background Dietary patterns are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in the general population, but diet-CVD association in populations with diabetes mellitus is limited. Our objective was to examine the association between diet quality and CVD risk in a population with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results We analyzed prospective data from 5809 women with prevalent type 2 diabetes mellitus at baseline from the Women's Health Initiative. Diet quality was defined using alternate Mediterranean, Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension, Paleolithic, and American Diabetes Association dietary pattern scores calculated from a validated food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable Cox's proportional hazard regression was used to analyze the risk of incident CVD. During mean 12.4 years of follow-up, 1454 (25%) incident CVD cases were documented. Women with higher alternate Mediterranean, Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension, and American Diabetes Association dietary pattern scores had a lower risk of CVD compared with women with lower scores (Q5 v Q1) (hazard ratio [HR]aMed 0.77, 95% CI 0.65-0.93; HRDASH 0.69, 95% CI 0.58-0.83; HRADA 0.71, 95% CI 0.59-0.86). No association was observed between the Paleolithic score and CVD risk. Conclusions Dietary patterns that emphasize higher intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts/seeds, legumes, a high unsaturated:saturated fat ratio, and lower intake of red and processed meats, added sugars, and sodium are associated with lower CVD risk in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

AB - Background Dietary patterns are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in the general population, but diet-CVD association in populations with diabetes mellitus is limited. Our objective was to examine the association between diet quality and CVD risk in a population with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results We analyzed prospective data from 5809 women with prevalent type 2 diabetes mellitus at baseline from the Women's Health Initiative. Diet quality was defined using alternate Mediterranean, Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension, Paleolithic, and American Diabetes Association dietary pattern scores calculated from a validated food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable Cox's proportional hazard regression was used to analyze the risk of incident CVD. During mean 12.4 years of follow-up, 1454 (25%) incident CVD cases were documented. Women with higher alternate Mediterranean, Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension, and American Diabetes Association dietary pattern scores had a lower risk of CVD compared with women with lower scores (Q5 v Q1) (hazard ratio [HR]aMed 0.77, 95% CI 0.65-0.93; HRDASH 0.69, 95% CI 0.58-0.83; HRADA 0.71, 95% CI 0.59-0.86). No association was observed between the Paleolithic score and CVD risk. Conclusions Dietary patterns that emphasize higher intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts/seeds, legumes, a high unsaturated:saturated fat ratio, and lower intake of red and processed meats, added sugars, and sodium are associated with lower CVD risk in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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