Diet Quality among Yup'ik Eskimos Living in Rural Communities Is Low: The Center for Alaska Native Health Research Pilot Study

Andrea Bersamin, Bret R. Luick, Elizabeth Ruppert, Judith S. Stern, Sheri Zidenberg-Cherr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objectives of this pilot study were to describe the nutrient intake of Yup'ik Eskimos in comparison with national intake, identify dietary sources of key nutrients, and assess the utility of the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) to measure diet quality of Yup'ik Eskimos living in rural Alaskan Native communities. Participants and Design: A single 24-hour recall was collected from 48 male and 44 female Yup'ik Eskimos (aged 14 to 81 years), who resided in three villages in the Yukon Kuskokwim River Delta, AK, during September 2003. Main Outcome Measures: HEI scores, nutrient intake, and traditional food intake. Statistical Analyses Performed: Spearman correlations for associations between variables. Results: Youth scored higher than elders despite similar nutrient intakes. Overall diet quality was generally low; 63% of all participants' diets were classified as poor. Although the HEI serves to identify areas of concern with respect to diet quality, it is limited in its ability to detect the positive value of traditional foods. Conclusions: Traditional foods and healthful market foods, including rich sources of fiber and calcium, should be encouraged. Although traditional foods were important sources of energy and nutrients, market foods composed the preponderance of the diet, emphasizing the importance of appropriately modifying a diet quality index based on a Western framework, such as the HEI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1055-1063
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume106
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Alaska Natives
Inuits
Eskimos
traditional foods
healthy diet
rural communities
nutritional adequacy
Rural Population
nutrient intake
Diet
Food
Health
Research
food intake
markets
Yukon Territory
nutrients
diet
villages
dietary fiber

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Diet Quality among Yup'ik Eskimos Living in Rural Communities Is Low : The Center for Alaska Native Health Research Pilot Study. / Bersamin, Andrea; Luick, Bret R.; Ruppert, Elizabeth; Stern, Judith S.; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri.

In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 106, No. 7, 07.2006, p. 1055-1063.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bersamin, Andrea ; Luick, Bret R. ; Ruppert, Elizabeth ; Stern, Judith S. ; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri. / Diet Quality among Yup'ik Eskimos Living in Rural Communities Is Low : The Center for Alaska Native Health Research Pilot Study. In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 2006 ; Vol. 106, No. 7. pp. 1055-1063.
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