Diagnostic imaging findings and endocrine test results in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism that did or did not have neurologic abnormalities: 157 cases (1989-2005)

Farica D. Wood, Rachel E Pollard, Megan R. Uerling, Edward C Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective-To compare imaging findings in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) that did or did not have neurologic abnormalities. Design-Retrospective case series. Animals-157 dogs with PDH that did (n = 73) or did not (84) have neurologic abnormalities. Procedures-Medical records were reviewed for the presence and nature of clinical signs of CNS disease, and computed tomographic and magnetic resonance images were reviewed for evidence of a pituitary tumor. Results-60 of the 84 (71 %) dogs without neurologic abnormalities and 48 of the 73 (66%) dogs with neurologic abnormalities had a detectable pituitary tumor. However, 17 of the 84 (20%) dogs without neurologic abnormalities had a pituitary macrotumor (ie, a tumor ≥10 mm in height), and 41 of the 73 (56%) dogs with neurologic abnormalities did not have a detectable pituitary tumor or had a pituitary microtumor. Vague signs of CNS dysfunction (ie, lethargy, inappetence, and mental dullness) were more specific for detection of pituitary macrotumors than were CNS-specific signs (ie, seizure or blindness). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results suggested that there was no apparent relationship between a pituitary tumor and development of neurologic abnormalities in dogs with PDH. In addition, neurologic abnormalities in dogs with pituitary macrotumors were often vague (ie, lethargy, inappetence, and mental dullness).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1081-1085
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume231
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007

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Adrenocortical Hyperfunction
Nervous System Malformations
hyperadrenocorticism
Diagnostic Imaging
nervous system
image analysis
Dogs
dogs
Pituitary Neoplasms
neoplasms
testing
Lethargy
Nervous System Neoplasms
neurodevelopment
blindness
Central Nervous System Diseases
Blindness
seizures
Medical Records
Seizures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Diagnostic imaging findings and endocrine test results in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism that did or did not have neurologic abnormalities: 157 cases (1989-2005)",
abstract = "Objective-To compare imaging findings in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) that did or did not have neurologic abnormalities. Design-Retrospective case series. Animals-157 dogs with PDH that did (n = 73) or did not (84) have neurologic abnormalities. Procedures-Medical records were reviewed for the presence and nature of clinical signs of CNS disease, and computed tomographic and magnetic resonance images were reviewed for evidence of a pituitary tumor. Results-60 of the 84 (71 {\%}) dogs without neurologic abnormalities and 48 of the 73 (66{\%}) dogs with neurologic abnormalities had a detectable pituitary tumor. However, 17 of the 84 (20{\%}) dogs without neurologic abnormalities had a pituitary macrotumor (ie, a tumor ≥10 mm in height), and 41 of the 73 (56{\%}) dogs with neurologic abnormalities did not have a detectable pituitary tumor or had a pituitary microtumor. Vague signs of CNS dysfunction (ie, lethargy, inappetence, and mental dullness) were more specific for detection of pituitary macrotumors than were CNS-specific signs (ie, seizure or blindness). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results suggested that there was no apparent relationship between a pituitary tumor and development of neurologic abnormalities in dogs with PDH. In addition, neurologic abnormalities in dogs with pituitary macrotumors were often vague (ie, lethargy, inappetence, and mental dullness).",
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T1 - Diagnostic imaging findings and endocrine test results in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism that did or did not have neurologic abnormalities

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AU - Pollard, Rachel E

AU - Uerling, Megan R.

AU - Feldman, Edward C

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N2 - Objective-To compare imaging findings in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) that did or did not have neurologic abnormalities. Design-Retrospective case series. Animals-157 dogs with PDH that did (n = 73) or did not (84) have neurologic abnormalities. Procedures-Medical records were reviewed for the presence and nature of clinical signs of CNS disease, and computed tomographic and magnetic resonance images were reviewed for evidence of a pituitary tumor. Results-60 of the 84 (71 %) dogs without neurologic abnormalities and 48 of the 73 (66%) dogs with neurologic abnormalities had a detectable pituitary tumor. However, 17 of the 84 (20%) dogs without neurologic abnormalities had a pituitary macrotumor (ie, a tumor ≥10 mm in height), and 41 of the 73 (56%) dogs with neurologic abnormalities did not have a detectable pituitary tumor or had a pituitary microtumor. Vague signs of CNS dysfunction (ie, lethargy, inappetence, and mental dullness) were more specific for detection of pituitary macrotumors than were CNS-specific signs (ie, seizure or blindness). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results suggested that there was no apparent relationship between a pituitary tumor and development of neurologic abnormalities in dogs with PDH. In addition, neurologic abnormalities in dogs with pituitary macrotumors were often vague (ie, lethargy, inappetence, and mental dullness).

AB - Objective-To compare imaging findings in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) that did or did not have neurologic abnormalities. Design-Retrospective case series. Animals-157 dogs with PDH that did (n = 73) or did not (84) have neurologic abnormalities. Procedures-Medical records were reviewed for the presence and nature of clinical signs of CNS disease, and computed tomographic and magnetic resonance images were reviewed for evidence of a pituitary tumor. Results-60 of the 84 (71 %) dogs without neurologic abnormalities and 48 of the 73 (66%) dogs with neurologic abnormalities had a detectable pituitary tumor. However, 17 of the 84 (20%) dogs without neurologic abnormalities had a pituitary macrotumor (ie, a tumor ≥10 mm in height), and 41 of the 73 (56%) dogs with neurologic abnormalities did not have a detectable pituitary tumor or had a pituitary microtumor. Vague signs of CNS dysfunction (ie, lethargy, inappetence, and mental dullness) were more specific for detection of pituitary macrotumors than were CNS-specific signs (ie, seizure or blindness). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results suggested that there was no apparent relationship between a pituitary tumor and development of neurologic abnormalities in dogs with PDH. In addition, neurologic abnormalities in dogs with pituitary macrotumors were often vague (ie, lethargy, inappetence, and mental dullness).

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