Diagnostic approach to health care-and device-associated central nervous system infections

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Health care-and device-associated central nervous system (CNS) infections have a distinct epidemiology, pathophysiology, and microbiology that requirea unique diagnostic approach. Most clinical signs, symptoms, and tests used to diagnose community-acquired CNS infections are insensitive and nonspecific in neurosurgical patients due to postsurgical changes, invasive devices, prior antimicrobial exposure, and underlying CNS disease. The lack of a standardized definition of infectionor diagnostic pathway has added to this challenge. In this review, we summarize theepidemiology, microbiology, and clinical presentation of these infections, discuss theissues with existing microbiologic tests, and give an overview of the current diagnostic approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere00861
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume56
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

Central Nervous System Infections
Microbiology
Delivery of Health Care
Equipment and Supplies
Central Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms
Epidemiology
Infection

Keywords

  • Central nervous system infections
  • Implanted devices
  • Meningitis
  • Ventriculitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Diagnostic approach to health care-and device-associated central nervous system infections. / Martin, Ryan; Zimmermann, Lara; Huynh, Mindy; Polage, Christopher R.

In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Vol. 56, No. 11, e00861, 01.11.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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