Development of the Landis technique for measuring the filtration coefficient of individual capillaries in the frog mesentery

C. C. Michel, J. C. Mason, F. E. Curry, J. E. Tooke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two methods are described for measuring the filtration coefficient of individually perfused frog mesenteric capillaries. Both methods involve the perfusion of capillaries via a micropipette with a solution in which a small number of human red cells are suspended. After a short period of perfusion, the capillary is occluded at a point some 500 μm or more downstream from the point of cannulation. Movements of the red cells in the isolated capillary micropipette system are interpreted to be the consequence of fluid movements across the capillary wall. The filtration coefficient of the capillary is determined either (method I) from a series of different filtration rates measured at different capillary hydrostatic pressures when intracapillary colloid osmotic pressure is constant, or (method II) from the changes in filtration rate as the fluid within the capillary concentrates at a constant pressure. Values for the filtration coefficient obtained by both methods have a skewed distribution. Determinations made by method I at 14-16°C have a peak value of 2 x 10-3 μm/sec-1 . cm H2O-1 and determinations made by method II at 22-26°C have a peak value of 5 x 10-3 μm/sec-1 . cm H2O-1. The assumptions underlying both methods are discussed and a mathematical model of the change in protein concentration in a closed off capillary at constant pressure is presented in the appendix.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-309
Number of pages27
JournalQuarterly Journal of Experimental Physiology
Volume59
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1974
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mesentery
Anura
Perfusion
Pressure
Hydrostatic Pressure
Osmotic Pressure
Colloids
Catheterization
Cell Movement
Theoretical Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Development of the Landis technique for measuring the filtration coefficient of individual capillaries in the frog mesentery. / Michel, C. C.; Mason, J. C.; Curry, F. E.; Tooke, J. E.

In: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Physiology, Vol. 59, No. 4, 1974, p. 283-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ffd1d32b424445c8b6458b7ad267e983,
title = "Development of the Landis technique for measuring the filtration coefficient of individual capillaries in the frog mesentery",
abstract = "Two methods are described for measuring the filtration coefficient of individually perfused frog mesenteric capillaries. Both methods involve the perfusion of capillaries via a micropipette with a solution in which a small number of human red cells are suspended. After a short period of perfusion, the capillary is occluded at a point some 500 μm or more downstream from the point of cannulation. Movements of the red cells in the isolated capillary micropipette system are interpreted to be the consequence of fluid movements across the capillary wall. The filtration coefficient of the capillary is determined either (method I) from a series of different filtration rates measured at different capillary hydrostatic pressures when intracapillary colloid osmotic pressure is constant, or (method II) from the changes in filtration rate as the fluid within the capillary concentrates at a constant pressure. Values for the filtration coefficient obtained by both methods have a skewed distribution. Determinations made by method I at 14-16°C have a peak value of 2 x 10-3 μm/sec-1 . cm H2O-1 and determinations made by method II at 22-26°C have a peak value of 5 x 10-3 μm/sec-1 . cm H2O-1. The assumptions underlying both methods are discussed and a mathematical model of the change in protein concentration in a closed off capillary at constant pressure is presented in the appendix.",
author = "Michel, {C. C.} and Mason, {J. C.} and Curry, {F. E.} and Tooke, {J. E.}",
year = "1974",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "59",
pages = "283--309",
journal = "Experimental Physiology",
issn = "0958-0670",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Development of the Landis technique for measuring the filtration coefficient of individual capillaries in the frog mesentery

AU - Michel, C. C.

AU - Mason, J. C.

AU - Curry, F. E.

AU - Tooke, J. E.

PY - 1974

Y1 - 1974

N2 - Two methods are described for measuring the filtration coefficient of individually perfused frog mesenteric capillaries. Both methods involve the perfusion of capillaries via a micropipette with a solution in which a small number of human red cells are suspended. After a short period of perfusion, the capillary is occluded at a point some 500 μm or more downstream from the point of cannulation. Movements of the red cells in the isolated capillary micropipette system are interpreted to be the consequence of fluid movements across the capillary wall. The filtration coefficient of the capillary is determined either (method I) from a series of different filtration rates measured at different capillary hydrostatic pressures when intracapillary colloid osmotic pressure is constant, or (method II) from the changes in filtration rate as the fluid within the capillary concentrates at a constant pressure. Values for the filtration coefficient obtained by both methods have a skewed distribution. Determinations made by method I at 14-16°C have a peak value of 2 x 10-3 μm/sec-1 . cm H2O-1 and determinations made by method II at 22-26°C have a peak value of 5 x 10-3 μm/sec-1 . cm H2O-1. The assumptions underlying both methods are discussed and a mathematical model of the change in protein concentration in a closed off capillary at constant pressure is presented in the appendix.

AB - Two methods are described for measuring the filtration coefficient of individually perfused frog mesenteric capillaries. Both methods involve the perfusion of capillaries via a micropipette with a solution in which a small number of human red cells are suspended. After a short period of perfusion, the capillary is occluded at a point some 500 μm or more downstream from the point of cannulation. Movements of the red cells in the isolated capillary micropipette system are interpreted to be the consequence of fluid movements across the capillary wall. The filtration coefficient of the capillary is determined either (method I) from a series of different filtration rates measured at different capillary hydrostatic pressures when intracapillary colloid osmotic pressure is constant, or (method II) from the changes in filtration rate as the fluid within the capillary concentrates at a constant pressure. Values for the filtration coefficient obtained by both methods have a skewed distribution. Determinations made by method I at 14-16°C have a peak value of 2 x 10-3 μm/sec-1 . cm H2O-1 and determinations made by method II at 22-26°C have a peak value of 5 x 10-3 μm/sec-1 . cm H2O-1. The assumptions underlying both methods are discussed and a mathematical model of the change in protein concentration in a closed off capillary at constant pressure is presented in the appendix.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0016278079&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0016278079&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 4548540

AN - SCOPUS:0016278079

VL - 59

SP - 283

EP - 309

JO - Experimental Physiology

JF - Experimental Physiology

SN - 0958-0670

IS - 4

ER -