Development of micropower ultrawideband impulse radar medical diagnostic systems for continuous monitoring applications and austere environments

John T Chang, Christine Paulson, Patrick Welsh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper discusses the application of Micropower Ultrawideband Impulse Radar (MUIR) technology to the detection and monitoring of intracranial hemorrhage. MUIR is ideally suited for medical diagnostic and monitoring applications because the emitted electromagnetic radiation is non-ionizing and has both peak and average power levels that are orders of magnitude lower than those of a hand-held cell phone. Furthermore, MUIR can be readily packaged into handheld, battery operated form factors. There are numerous applications for such a device: rural settings with limited CT access; field use where excessive hemodynamic instability may preclude patient transport; natural disaster or conflict events that require on-site triage; and for hospital bedside monitoring. In experimental phantoms and in a small human subjects study, MUIR technology successfully detects reflected signals from near-surface hematomas. These investigations suggest the feasibility of developing MUIR-based systems for pre-hospital or bedside diagnostic applications to assist with early diagnosis, triage, and treatment planning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIEEE National Radar Conference - Proceedings
Pages699-704
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event2012 IEEE Radar Conference: Ubiquitous Radar, RADARCON 2012 - Atlanta, GA, United States
Duration: May 7 2012May 11 2012

Other

Other2012 IEEE Radar Conference: Ubiquitous Radar, RADARCON 2012
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta, GA
Period5/7/125/11/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Development of micropower ultrawideband impulse radar medical diagnostic systems for continuous monitoring applications and austere environments'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this