Development of inexpensive blood imaging systems

Where are we now?

Kaiqin Chu, Zachary J. Smith, Sebastian Wachsmann-Hogiu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinical applications in the developing world, such as malaria and anemia diagnosis, demand a change in the medical paradigm of expensive care given in central locations by highly trained professionals. There has been a recent explosion in optical technologies entering the consumer market through the widespread adoption of smartphones and LEDs. This technology commoditization has enabled the development of small, portable optical imaging systems at an unprecedentedly low cost. Here, we review the state-of-the-field of the application of these systems for low-cost blood imaging with an emphasis on cellular imaging systems. In addition to some promising results addressing specific clinical issues, an overview of the technology landscape is provided. We also discuss several key issues that need to be addressed before these technologies can be commercialized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)613-627
Number of pages15
JournalExpert Review of Medical Devices
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 3 2015

Fingerprint

Imaging systems
Blood
Technology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Optical Devices
Explosions
Optical Imaging
Smartphones
Malaria
Light emitting diodes
Costs
Anemia
Imaging techniques

Keywords

  • anemia
  • blood
  • hematology
  • HIV
  • imaging
  • malaria
  • microscopy
  • optics
  • point-of-care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Development of inexpensive blood imaging systems : Where are we now? / Chu, Kaiqin; Smith, Zachary J.; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian.

In: Expert Review of Medical Devices, Vol. 12, No. 5, 03.09.2015, p. 613-627.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4e3e3a41908c41b4b42ec54c543a4538,
title = "Development of inexpensive blood imaging systems: Where are we now?",
abstract = "Clinical applications in the developing world, such as malaria and anemia diagnosis, demand a change in the medical paradigm of expensive care given in central locations by highly trained professionals. There has been a recent explosion in optical technologies entering the consumer market through the widespread adoption of smartphones and LEDs. This technology commoditization has enabled the development of small, portable optical imaging systems at an unprecedentedly low cost. Here, we review the state-of-the-field of the application of these systems for low-cost blood imaging with an emphasis on cellular imaging systems. In addition to some promising results addressing specific clinical issues, an overview of the technology landscape is provided. We also discuss several key issues that need to be addressed before these technologies can be commercialized.",
keywords = "anemia, blood, hematology, HIV, imaging, malaria, microscopy, optics, point-of-care",
author = "Kaiqin Chu and Smith, {Zachary J.} and Sebastian Wachsmann-Hogiu",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1586/17434440.2015.1075388",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "613--627",
journal = "Expert Review of Medical Devices",
issn = "1743-4440",
publisher = "Expert Reviews Ltd.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Development of inexpensive blood imaging systems

T2 - Where are we now?

AU - Chu, Kaiqin

AU - Smith, Zachary J.

AU - Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

PY - 2015/9/3

Y1 - 2015/9/3

N2 - Clinical applications in the developing world, such as malaria and anemia diagnosis, demand a change in the medical paradigm of expensive care given in central locations by highly trained professionals. There has been a recent explosion in optical technologies entering the consumer market through the widespread adoption of smartphones and LEDs. This technology commoditization has enabled the development of small, portable optical imaging systems at an unprecedentedly low cost. Here, we review the state-of-the-field of the application of these systems for low-cost blood imaging with an emphasis on cellular imaging systems. In addition to some promising results addressing specific clinical issues, an overview of the technology landscape is provided. We also discuss several key issues that need to be addressed before these technologies can be commercialized.

AB - Clinical applications in the developing world, such as malaria and anemia diagnosis, demand a change in the medical paradigm of expensive care given in central locations by highly trained professionals. There has been a recent explosion in optical technologies entering the consumer market through the widespread adoption of smartphones and LEDs. This technology commoditization has enabled the development of small, portable optical imaging systems at an unprecedentedly low cost. Here, we review the state-of-the-field of the application of these systems for low-cost blood imaging with an emphasis on cellular imaging systems. In addition to some promising results addressing specific clinical issues, an overview of the technology landscape is provided. We also discuss several key issues that need to be addressed before these technologies can be commercialized.

KW - anemia

KW - blood

KW - hematology

KW - HIV

KW - imaging

KW - malaria

KW - microscopy

KW - optics

KW - point-of-care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84940584163&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84940584163&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1586/17434440.2015.1075388

DO - 10.1586/17434440.2015.1075388

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 613

EP - 627

JO - Expert Review of Medical Devices

JF - Expert Review of Medical Devices

SN - 1743-4440

IS - 5

ER -