Development of a theory of mind in individuals with mental retardation

G. Benson, Leonard J Abbeduto, K. Short, J. B. Nuccio, F. Maas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability of adolescents with mental retardation to reason about other people's mental states was examined. Subjects were asked questions about the knowledge and beliefs of characters in stories that they heard and saw enacted with props. The adolescents with mental retardation performed worse than did children without mental retardation matched for MA. The adolescents with mental retardation did better on questions requiring first-order reasoning than on those involving second-order reasoning; this pattern is similar to that found previously for children without mental retardation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-433
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal on Mental Retardation
Volume98
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Theory of Mind
Intellectual Disability
adolescent
Aptitude
ability
Mental Retardation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Development of a theory of mind in individuals with mental retardation. / Benson, G.; Abbeduto, Leonard J; Short, K.; Nuccio, J. B.; Maas, F.

In: American Journal on Mental Retardation, Vol. 98, No. 3, 1993, p. 427-433.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Benson, G, Abbeduto, LJ, Short, K, Nuccio, JB & Maas, F 1993, 'Development of a theory of mind in individuals with mental retardation', American Journal on Mental Retardation, vol. 98, no. 3, pp. 427-433.
Benson, G. ; Abbeduto, Leonard J ; Short, K. ; Nuccio, J. B. ; Maas, F. / Development of a theory of mind in individuals with mental retardation. In: American Journal on Mental Retardation. 1993 ; Vol. 98, No. 3. pp. 427-433.
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