Development of a simulation model to evaluate the effect of vaccination against Tritrichomonas foetus on productive effieciency in beef herds

Aurora Villarroel, Tim Carpenter, Robert Bondurant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To develop a model to evaluate the effect of vaccination against Tritrichomonas foetus on reproductive efficiency in beef herds. Sample Population - A beef herd of 300 cows and 12 bulls (8 bulls ≤ 3 years old and 4 bulls > 3 years old). Procedure - The model was developed by use of data for various risk factors and vaccine efficacy. The reference herd was considered to be one in which T foetus had been diagnosed and bulls were tested for T foetus before the breeding season. Five thousand iterations were run for each of 13 simulations, with each simulation representing a separate combination of risk factors. Results - In all simulations, vaccination resulted in significantly higher calving incidence than nonvaccination. Shared grazing was found to be the most significant risk factor for a decrease in calving incidence attributable to T foetus infection, followed in importance by lack of testing before the breeding season and a higher proportion of old bulls. Combinations of risk factors contributed to a loss of income of up to 22%, some of which could be blunted by vaccination. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Highest calving incidence is achieved when all bulls are tested for T foetus before the breeding season and all bulls with positive culture results are culled. Avoiding all risk factors is better than vaccinating, but when this is not feasible for a given herd, the results of this simulation indicate that proper vaccination can decrease economic losses attributable to abortions caused by T foetus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)770-775
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume65
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

Fingerprint

Tritrichomonas foetus
bulls
simulation models
Vaccination
beef
Fetus
herds
vaccination
fetus
risk factors
Breeding
calving
breeding season
Incidence
incidence
abortion (animals)
reproductive efficiency
Vaccines
Economics
Red Meat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

@article{740f3621f891462da2a5cc30545e2253,
title = "Development of a simulation model to evaluate the effect of vaccination against Tritrichomonas foetus on productive effieciency in beef herds",
abstract = "Objective - To develop a model to evaluate the effect of vaccination against Tritrichomonas foetus on reproductive efficiency in beef herds. Sample Population - A beef herd of 300 cows and 12 bulls (8 bulls ≤ 3 years old and 4 bulls > 3 years old). Procedure - The model was developed by use of data for various risk factors and vaccine efficacy. The reference herd was considered to be one in which T foetus had been diagnosed and bulls were tested for T foetus before the breeding season. Five thousand iterations were run for each of 13 simulations, with each simulation representing a separate combination of risk factors. Results - In all simulations, vaccination resulted in significantly higher calving incidence than nonvaccination. Shared grazing was found to be the most significant risk factor for a decrease in calving incidence attributable to T foetus infection, followed in importance by lack of testing before the breeding season and a higher proportion of old bulls. Combinations of risk factors contributed to a loss of income of up to 22{\%}, some of which could be blunted by vaccination. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Highest calving incidence is achieved when all bulls are tested for T foetus before the breeding season and all bulls with positive culture results are culled. Avoiding all risk factors is better than vaccinating, but when this is not feasible for a given herd, the results of this simulation indicate that proper vaccination can decrease economic losses attributable to abortions caused by T foetus.",
author = "Aurora Villarroel and Tim Carpenter and Robert Bondurant",
year = "2004",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2460/ajvr.2004.65.770",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "65",
pages = "770--775",
journal = "American Journal of Veterinary Research",
issn = "0002-9645",
publisher = "American Veterinary Medical Association",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Development of a simulation model to evaluate the effect of vaccination against Tritrichomonas foetus on productive effieciency in beef herds

AU - Villarroel, Aurora

AU - Carpenter, Tim

AU - Bondurant, Robert

PY - 2004/6/1

Y1 - 2004/6/1

N2 - Objective - To develop a model to evaluate the effect of vaccination against Tritrichomonas foetus on reproductive efficiency in beef herds. Sample Population - A beef herd of 300 cows and 12 bulls (8 bulls ≤ 3 years old and 4 bulls > 3 years old). Procedure - The model was developed by use of data for various risk factors and vaccine efficacy. The reference herd was considered to be one in which T foetus had been diagnosed and bulls were tested for T foetus before the breeding season. Five thousand iterations were run for each of 13 simulations, with each simulation representing a separate combination of risk factors. Results - In all simulations, vaccination resulted in significantly higher calving incidence than nonvaccination. Shared grazing was found to be the most significant risk factor for a decrease in calving incidence attributable to T foetus infection, followed in importance by lack of testing before the breeding season and a higher proportion of old bulls. Combinations of risk factors contributed to a loss of income of up to 22%, some of which could be blunted by vaccination. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Highest calving incidence is achieved when all bulls are tested for T foetus before the breeding season and all bulls with positive culture results are culled. Avoiding all risk factors is better than vaccinating, but when this is not feasible for a given herd, the results of this simulation indicate that proper vaccination can decrease economic losses attributable to abortions caused by T foetus.

AB - Objective - To develop a model to evaluate the effect of vaccination against Tritrichomonas foetus on reproductive efficiency in beef herds. Sample Population - A beef herd of 300 cows and 12 bulls (8 bulls ≤ 3 years old and 4 bulls > 3 years old). Procedure - The model was developed by use of data for various risk factors and vaccine efficacy. The reference herd was considered to be one in which T foetus had been diagnosed and bulls were tested for T foetus before the breeding season. Five thousand iterations were run for each of 13 simulations, with each simulation representing a separate combination of risk factors. Results - In all simulations, vaccination resulted in significantly higher calving incidence than nonvaccination. Shared grazing was found to be the most significant risk factor for a decrease in calving incidence attributable to T foetus infection, followed in importance by lack of testing before the breeding season and a higher proportion of old bulls. Combinations of risk factors contributed to a loss of income of up to 22%, some of which could be blunted by vaccination. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Highest calving incidence is achieved when all bulls are tested for T foetus before the breeding season and all bulls with positive culture results are culled. Avoiding all risk factors is better than vaccinating, but when this is not feasible for a given herd, the results of this simulation indicate that proper vaccination can decrease economic losses attributable to abortions caused by T foetus.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=3042678982&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=3042678982&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2460/ajvr.2004.65.770

DO - 10.2460/ajvr.2004.65.770

M3 - Article

C2 - 15198217

AN - SCOPUS:3042678982

VL - 65

SP - 770

EP - 775

JO - American Journal of Veterinary Research

JF - American Journal of Veterinary Research

SN - 0002-9645

IS - 6

ER -