Development of a culturally-adapted graphic novella about emergency communication: Collaborations with a limited English speaking Chinese immigrant community

Devora Eisenberg, Lena Seino, Hendrika Meischke, Shin-Ping Tu, Anne M. Turner, Brooke Ike, Ian Painter, Mei Po Yip

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Bystander CPR doubles survival from cardiac arrest but limited English proficient (LEP) individuals face barriers calling 911 and performing CPR. Previous training increases the chance that an individual will perform CPR, yet access to classes in non-English speaking populations is limited. We used a cultural adaptation approach to develop a graphic novella for Chinese LEP immigrants about how to call 911 and perform bystander CPR. Collaboration with members of this community occurred through all stages of novella development. One hundred and thirty-two LEP Chinese adults read the novella and answered a survey measuring behavioral intentions. All respondents stated they would call 911 after witnessing a person’s collapse, but those previously trained in CPR were more likely to say that they would perform CPR. All participants indicated that they would recommend this novella to others. Developing culturally-responsive evidence-based interventions is necessary to reduce disproportionate death and disability from cardiac arrest in LEP communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1199-1210
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Emergencies
Communication
Heart Arrest
Survival
Population

Keywords

  • 911 education
  • Cardiac arrest education
  • Chinese speakers
  • Cultural adaptation
  • Graphic novella
  • Limited English proficient

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Development of a culturally-adapted graphic novella about emergency communication : Collaborations with a limited English speaking Chinese immigrant community. / Eisenberg, Devora; Seino, Lena; Meischke, Hendrika; Tu, Shin-Ping; Turner, Anne M.; Ike, Brooke; Painter, Ian; Yip, Mei Po.

In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.08.2016, p. 1199-1210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eisenberg, Devora ; Seino, Lena ; Meischke, Hendrika ; Tu, Shin-Ping ; Turner, Anne M. ; Ike, Brooke ; Painter, Ian ; Yip, Mei Po. / Development of a culturally-adapted graphic novella about emergency communication : Collaborations with a limited English speaking Chinese immigrant community. In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. 2016 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 1199-1210.
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