Development, History, and Future of Automated Cell Counters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Modern automated hematology instruments use either optical methods (light scatter), impedance-based methods based on the Coulter principle (changes in electrical current induced by blood cells flowing through an electrically charged opening), or a combination of both optical and impedance-based methods. Progressive improvement in these instruments has allowed the enumeration and evaluation of blood cells with great accuracy, precision, and speed at very low cost. Future directions of hematology instrumentation include the addition of new parameters and the development of point-of-care instrumentation. In the future, in-vivo analysis of blood cells may allow noninvasive and near-continuous measurements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalClinics in Laboratory Medicine
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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Blood Cells
Blood
History
Cells
Hematology
Electric Impedance
Point-of-Care Systems
Induced currents
Light
Costs and Cost Analysis
Costs
Direction compound

Keywords

  • Automated cell counter
  • Blood
  • Electrical impedance counting
  • Flow cytometry
  • Hematology
  • Hemoglobin
  • Light scattering
  • Point of Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Development, History, and Future of Automated Cell Counters. / Green, Ralph; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian.

In: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.03.2015, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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