Development and validation of a canine radius replica for mechanical testing of orthopedic implants

Jeffrey P. Little, Timothy J. Horn, Denis J Marcellin-Little, Ola L.A. Harrysson, Harvey A. West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective-To design and fabricate fiberglass-reinforced composite (FRC) replicas of a ca- nine radius and compare their mechanical properties with those of radii from dog cadavers. Sample-Replicas based on 3 FRC formulations with 33%, 50%, or 60% short-length discontinuous fiberglass by weight (7 replicas/group) and 5 radii from large (> 30-kg) dog cadavers. Procedures-Bones and FRC replicas underwent nondestructive mechanical testing in- cluding 4-point bending, axial loading, and torsion and destructive testing to failure during 4-point bending. Axial, internal and external torsional, and bending stiffnesses were calcu- lated. Axial pullout loads for bone screws placed in the replicas and cadaveric radii were also assessed. Results-Axial, internal and external torsional, and 4-point bending stiffnesses of FRC replicas increased significantly with increasing fiberglass content. The 4-point bending stiffness of 33% and 50% FRC replicas and axial and internal torsional stiffnesses of 33% FRC replicas were equivalent to the cadaveric bone stiffnesses. Ultimate 4-point bending loads did not differ significantly between FRC replicas and bones. Ultimate screw pullout loads did not differ significantly between 33% or 50% FRC replicas and bones. Mechanical property variability (coefficient of variation) of cadaveric radii was approximately 2 to 19 times that of FRC replicas, depending on loading protocols. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Within the range of properties tested, FRC replicas had mechanical properties equivalent to and mechanical property variability less than those of radii from dog cadavers. Results indicated that FRC replicas may be a useful alternative to cadaveric bones for biomechanical testing of canine bone constructs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-33
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume73
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

fiberglass
radius (bone)
orthopedics
Orthopedics
Canidae
dogs
bones
testing
Bone and Bones
mechanical properties
Cadaver
Dogs
screws
Bone Screws
Weight-Bearing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Development and validation of a canine radius replica for mechanical testing of orthopedic implants. / Little, Jeffrey P.; Horn, Timothy J.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Harrysson, Ola L.A.; West, Harvey A.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 73, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 27-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Little, Jeffrey P. ; Horn, Timothy J. ; Marcellin-Little, Denis J ; Harrysson, Ola L.A. ; West, Harvey A. / Development and validation of a canine radius replica for mechanical testing of orthopedic implants. In: American Journal of Veterinary Research. 2012 ; Vol. 73, No. 1. pp. 27-33.
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