Development and evaluation of a real-time fluorescent polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of bovine contaminates in cattle feed

Gabriel Rensen, Wayne Smith, Juliana Ruzante, Mary Sawyer, Bennie Osburn, James S Cullor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

A real-time fluorescent polymerase chain reaction assay for detecting prohibited ruminant materials such as bovine meat and bone meal (BMBM) in cattle feed using primers and FRET probes targeting the ruminant specific mitochondrial cytochrome b gene was developed and evaluated on two different types of cattle feed. Common problems involved with PCR based testing of cattle feed include the presence of high levels of PCR inhibitors and the need for certain pre-sample processing techniques in order to perform DNA extractions. We have developed a presample processing technique for extracting DNA from cattle feed which does not require the feed sample to be ground to a fine powder and utilizes materials that are disposed of between samples, thus, reducing the potential of cross contamination. The DNA extraction method utilizes Whatman FTA® card technology, is adaptable to high sample throughput analysis and allows for room temperature storage with established archiving of samples of up to 14 years. The Whatman FTA® cards are subsequently treated with RNAse and undergo a Chelex-100 extraction (BioRad, Hercules, CA), thus removing potential PCR inhibitors and eluting the DNA from the FTA® card for downstream PCR analysis. The detection limit was evaluated over a period of 30 trials on calf starter mix and heifer starter ration feed samples spiked with known concentrations of BMBM. The PCR detection assay detected 0.05% wt/wt BMBM contamination with 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 100% confidence. Concentrations of 0.005% and 0.001% wt/wt BMBM contamination were also detected in both feed types but with varying levels of confidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)152-159
Number of pages8
JournalFoodborne Pathogens and Disease
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Food Science

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