Detection of Relapse by Tumor Markers Versus Imaging in Children and Adolescents With Nongerminomatous Malignant Germ Cell Tumors

A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

Adriana Fonseca, Caihong Xia, Armando J. Lorenzo, Mark Krailo, Thomas A. Olson, Farzana Pashankar, Marcio Malogolowkin, James F. Amatruda, Deborah F. Billmire, Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo, A. Lindsay Frazier, Furqan Shaikh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate relapse detection methods among children and adolescents with nongerminomatous malignant germ cell tumors (MGCTs) and to determine whether tumor markers alone might be sufficient for surveillance. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients enrolled in a phase III, single-arm trial for low-risk and intermediate-risk MGCTs. The method used to detect relapse was assessed based on case report forms, tumor markers, imaging, and pathology reports. Relapses were classified into one of two categories on the basis of whether they were (1) detectable by tumor marker elevation or (2) not detectable by tumor markers. RESULTS: A total of 302 patients were enrolled, and 284 patients had complete data for review. Seven patients had normal tumor markers at initial diagnosis, and none experienced a relapse. At a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 48 patients (16.9%) had experienced a relapse. After central review, 47 of 48 relapses (98%) were detected by tumor marker elevation. Of the 47 patients, 16 (33.3%) had abnormal tumor markers with normal/unknown imaging, 31 patients (64.6%) had abnormal tumor markers with abnormal imaging, and one patient (2.1%) had abnormal imaging with unknown marker levels at relapse. CONCLUSION: Tumor marker elevation is a highly sensitive method of relapse surveillance, at least among children and adolescents with tumor marker elevation at initial diagnosis. Eliminating exposure to imaging with ionizing radiation may enhance the safety of relapse surveillance in patients treated for MGCT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-402
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 10 2019

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Germ Cell and Embryonal Neoplasms
Tumor Biomarkers
Recurrence
Ionizing Radiation
Pathology
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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Detection of Relapse by Tumor Markers Versus Imaging in Children and Adolescents With Nongerminomatous Malignant Germ Cell Tumors : A Report From the Children's Oncology Group. / Fonseca, Adriana; Xia, Caihong; Lorenzo, Armando J.; Krailo, Mark; Olson, Thomas A.; Pashankar, Farzana; Malogolowkin, Marcio; Amatruda, James F.; Billmire, Deborah F.; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Frazier, A. Lindsay; Shaikh, Furqan.

In: Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 37, No. 5, 10.02.2019, p. 396-402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fonseca, Adriana ; Xia, Caihong ; Lorenzo, Armando J. ; Krailo, Mark ; Olson, Thomas A. ; Pashankar, Farzana ; Malogolowkin, Marcio ; Amatruda, James F. ; Billmire, Deborah F. ; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos ; Frazier, A. Lindsay ; Shaikh, Furqan. / Detection of Relapse by Tumor Markers Versus Imaging in Children and Adolescents With Nongerminomatous Malignant Germ Cell Tumors : A Report From the Children's Oncology Group. In: Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. 2019 ; Vol. 37, No. 5. pp. 396-402.
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abstract = "PURPOSE: To investigate relapse detection methods among children and adolescents with nongerminomatous malignant germ cell tumors (MGCTs) and to determine whether tumor markers alone might be sufficient for surveillance. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients enrolled in a phase III, single-arm trial for low-risk and intermediate-risk MGCTs. The method used to detect relapse was assessed based on case report forms, tumor markers, imaging, and pathology reports. Relapses were classified into one of two categories on the basis of whether they were (1) detectable by tumor marker elevation or (2) not detectable by tumor markers. RESULTS: A total of 302 patients were enrolled, and 284 patients had complete data for review. Seven patients had normal tumor markers at initial diagnosis, and none experienced a relapse. At a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 48 patients (16.9{\%}) had experienced a relapse. After central review, 47 of 48 relapses (98{\%}) were detected by tumor marker elevation. Of the 47 patients, 16 (33.3{\%}) had abnormal tumor markers with normal/unknown imaging, 31 patients (64.6{\%}) had abnormal tumor markers with abnormal imaging, and one patient (2.1{\%}) had abnormal imaging with unknown marker levels at relapse. CONCLUSION: Tumor marker elevation is a highly sensitive method of relapse surveillance, at least among children and adolescents with tumor marker elevation at initial diagnosis. Eliminating exposure to imaging with ionizing radiation may enhance the safety of relapse surveillance in patients treated for MGCT.",
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T2 - A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

AU - Fonseca, Adriana

AU - Xia, Caihong

AU - Lorenzo, Armando J.

AU - Krailo, Mark

AU - Olson, Thomas A.

AU - Pashankar, Farzana

AU - Malogolowkin, Marcio

AU - Amatruda, James F.

AU - Billmire, Deborah F.

AU - Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos

AU - Frazier, A. Lindsay

AU - Shaikh, Furqan

PY - 2019/2/10

Y1 - 2019/2/10

N2 - PURPOSE: To investigate relapse detection methods among children and adolescents with nongerminomatous malignant germ cell tumors (MGCTs) and to determine whether tumor markers alone might be sufficient for surveillance. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients enrolled in a phase III, single-arm trial for low-risk and intermediate-risk MGCTs. The method used to detect relapse was assessed based on case report forms, tumor markers, imaging, and pathology reports. Relapses were classified into one of two categories on the basis of whether they were (1) detectable by tumor marker elevation or (2) not detectable by tumor markers. RESULTS: A total of 302 patients were enrolled, and 284 patients had complete data for review. Seven patients had normal tumor markers at initial diagnosis, and none experienced a relapse. At a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 48 patients (16.9%) had experienced a relapse. After central review, 47 of 48 relapses (98%) were detected by tumor marker elevation. Of the 47 patients, 16 (33.3%) had abnormal tumor markers with normal/unknown imaging, 31 patients (64.6%) had abnormal tumor markers with abnormal imaging, and one patient (2.1%) had abnormal imaging with unknown marker levels at relapse. CONCLUSION: Tumor marker elevation is a highly sensitive method of relapse surveillance, at least among children and adolescents with tumor marker elevation at initial diagnosis. Eliminating exposure to imaging with ionizing radiation may enhance the safety of relapse surveillance in patients treated for MGCT.

AB - PURPOSE: To investigate relapse detection methods among children and adolescents with nongerminomatous malignant germ cell tumors (MGCTs) and to determine whether tumor markers alone might be sufficient for surveillance. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients enrolled in a phase III, single-arm trial for low-risk and intermediate-risk MGCTs. The method used to detect relapse was assessed based on case report forms, tumor markers, imaging, and pathology reports. Relapses were classified into one of two categories on the basis of whether they were (1) detectable by tumor marker elevation or (2) not detectable by tumor markers. RESULTS: A total of 302 patients were enrolled, and 284 patients had complete data for review. Seven patients had normal tumor markers at initial diagnosis, and none experienced a relapse. At a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 48 patients (16.9%) had experienced a relapse. After central review, 47 of 48 relapses (98%) were detected by tumor marker elevation. Of the 47 patients, 16 (33.3%) had abnormal tumor markers with normal/unknown imaging, 31 patients (64.6%) had abnormal tumor markers with abnormal imaging, and one patient (2.1%) had abnormal imaging with unknown marker levels at relapse. CONCLUSION: Tumor marker elevation is a highly sensitive method of relapse surveillance, at least among children and adolescents with tumor marker elevation at initial diagnosis. Eliminating exposure to imaging with ionizing radiation may enhance the safety of relapse surveillance in patients treated for MGCT.

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