Detection of intestinal protozoa in the clinical laboratory

Ian Howard Mchardy, Max Wu, Robyn Shimizu-Cohen, Marc Roger Couturier, Romney M. Humphries

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

86 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite recent advances in diagnostic technology, microscopic examination of stool specimens remains central to the diagnosis of most pathogenic intestinal protozoa. Microscopy is, however, labor-intensive and requires a skilled technologist. New, highly sensitive diagnostic methods have been developed for protozoa endemic to developed countries, including Giardia lamblia (syn. G. intestinalis/G. duodenalis) and Cryptosporidium spp., using technologies that, if expanded, could effectively complement or even replace microscopic approaches. To date, the scope of such novel technologies is limited and may not include common protozoa such as Dientamoeba fragilis, Entamoeba histolytica, or Cyclospora cayetanensis. This minireview describes canonical approaches for the detection of pathogenic intestinal protozoa, while highlighting recent developments and FDA-approved tools for clinical diagnosis of common intestinal protozoa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)712-720
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Mchardy, I. H., Wu, M., Shimizu-Cohen, R., Roger Couturier, M., & Humphries, R. M. (2014). Detection of intestinal protozoa in the clinical laboratory. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 52(3), 712-720. https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.02877-13