Detection of HIV-1-specific gastrointestinal tissue resident CD8 + T-cells in chronic infection

Brenna E. Kiniry, Shengbin Li, Anupama Ganesh, Peter W. Hunt, Ma Somsouk, Pamela J. Skinner, Steven G. Deeks, Barbara Shacklett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tissue-resident memory (T RM) CD8 + T-cells are non-recirculating, long-lived cells housed in tissues that can confer protection against mucosal pathogens. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is a mucosal pathogen and the gastrointestinal tract is an important site of viral pathogenesis and transmission. Thus, CD8 + T RM cells may be an important effector subset for controlling HIV-1 in mucosal tissues. This study sought to determine the abundance, phenotype, and functionality of CD8 + T RM cells in the context of chronic HIV-1 infection. We found that the majority of rectosigmoid CD8 + T-cells were CD69 + CD103 + S1PR1 ' and T-bet Low Eomesodermin Neg, indicative of a tissue-residency phenotype similar to that described in murine models. HIV-1-specific CD8 + T RM responses appeared strongest in individuals naturally controlling HIV-1 infection. Two CD8 + T RM subsets, distinguished by CD103 expression intensity, were identified. CD103 Low CD8 + T RM primarily displayed a transitional memory phenotype and contained HIV-1-specific cells and cells expressing high levels of Eomesodermin, whereas CD103 High CD8 + T RM primarily displayed an effector memory phenotype and were Eomesodermin Neg. These findings suggest a large fraction of CD8 + T-cells housed in the human rectosigmoid mucosa are tissue-resident and that T RM contribute to the anti-HIV-1 immune response. Further exploration of CD8 + T RM will inform development of anti-HIV-1 immune-based therapies and vaccines targeted to the mucosa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)909-920
Number of pages12
JournalMucosal Immunology
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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HIV-1
T-Lymphocytes
Infection
Phenotype
Mucous Membrane
Virus Diseases
Active Immunotherapy
Internship and Residency
Gastrointestinal Tract

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Detection of HIV-1-specific gastrointestinal tissue resident CD8 + T-cells in chronic infection. / Kiniry, Brenna E.; Li, Shengbin; Ganesh, Anupama; Hunt, Peter W.; Somsouk, Ma; Skinner, Pamela J.; Deeks, Steven G.; Shacklett, Barbara.

In: Mucosal Immunology, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.05.2018, p. 909-920.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kiniry, BE, Li, S, Ganesh, A, Hunt, PW, Somsouk, M, Skinner, PJ, Deeks, SG & Shacklett, B 2018, 'Detection of HIV-1-specific gastrointestinal tissue resident CD8 + T-cells in chronic infection', Mucosal Immunology, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 909-920. https://doi.org/10.1038/mi.2017.96
Kiniry, Brenna E. ; Li, Shengbin ; Ganesh, Anupama ; Hunt, Peter W. ; Somsouk, Ma ; Skinner, Pamela J. ; Deeks, Steven G. ; Shacklett, Barbara. / Detection of HIV-1-specific gastrointestinal tissue resident CD8 + T-cells in chronic infection. In: Mucosal Immunology. 2018 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 909-920.
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