Detection of Bartonella species, including Candidatus Bartonella ovis sp. nov, in ruminants from Mexico and lack of evidence of Bartonella DNA in saliva of common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) predating on them

Adam P. Raya, David A. Jaffe, Bruno B Chomel, Marissa S. Ota, Peter M. Tsou, Aaron Z. Davis, José Ignacio Olave-Leyva, Guillermo Galvez-Romero, Matthew J. Stuckey, Rickie W. Kasten, Cirani Obregón-Morales, Nidia Aréchiga-Ceballos, Flor Martinez-Martinez, Alvaro Aguilar-Setién

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bartonella spp. have been identified in many bat species worldwide, including the zoonotic species, Candidatus Bartonella mayotimonensis. The common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) preys preferentially on livestock in Latin America and is frequently infected with Bartonella spp. To determine the potential role of D. rotundus in transmitting Bartonella to livestock, common vampire bats and bat-bitten domestic ruminants from Mexico were tested for Bartonella infection by blood culture or conventional PCR. Furthermore, to explore the possibility of bite transmission during blood feeding, saliva swabs from 35 D. rotundus known to be either Bartonella bacteremic (N = 17) or blood culture negative (N = 18) were tested by PCR to detect the presence of Bartonella DNA. Twenty (17.1%) of 117 sheep and 16 (34.8%) of 46 cattle were Bartonella bacteremic by PCR testing. However, none of them were infected with Bartonella strains previously isolated from vampire bats and none of the 35 D. rotundus saliva swabs tested were PCR positive for Bartonella. All but two animals among those which were Bartonella culture and/or PCR positive, were infected with either B. bovis (cattle) or B. melophagi (sheep). Two sheep were infected by a possible new species, Candidatus Bartonella ovis, being phylogenetically closer to B. bovis than B. melophagi. This study does not support the role of D. rotundus as a reservoir of Bartonella species infecting livestock, which could be transmitted via bite and blood feeding and therefore suggest limited risk of zoonotic transmission of Bartonella from common vampire bats to humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-74
Number of pages6
JournalVeterinary Microbiology
Volume222
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

Fingerprint

Desmodus
Bartonella
Ovis
Ruminants
Mexico
saliva
Saliva
Chiroptera
ruminants
Sheep
new species
DNA
Livestock
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Zoonoses
livestock
Bites and Stings
blood
sheep
Bartonella Infections

Keywords

  • Bartonella
  • Desmodus rotundus
  • Mexico
  • Ruminants
  • Vampire bats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Detection of Bartonella species, including Candidatus Bartonella ovis sp. nov, in ruminants from Mexico and lack of evidence of Bartonella DNA in saliva of common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) predating on them. / Raya, Adam P.; Jaffe, David A.; Chomel, Bruno B; Ota, Marissa S.; Tsou, Peter M.; Davis, Aaron Z.; Olave-Leyva, José Ignacio; Galvez-Romero, Guillermo; Stuckey, Matthew J.; Kasten, Rickie W.; Obregón-Morales, Cirani; Aréchiga-Ceballos, Nidia; Martinez-Martinez, Flor; Aguilar-Setién, Alvaro.

In: Veterinary Microbiology, Vol. 222, 01.08.2018, p. 69-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raya, AP, Jaffe, DA, Chomel, BB, Ota, MS, Tsou, PM, Davis, AZ, Olave-Leyva, JI, Galvez-Romero, G, Stuckey, MJ, Kasten, RW, Obregón-Morales, C, Aréchiga-Ceballos, N, Martinez-Martinez, F & Aguilar-Setién, A 2018, 'Detection of Bartonella species, including Candidatus Bartonella ovis sp. nov, in ruminants from Mexico and lack of evidence of Bartonella DNA in saliva of common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) predating on them', Veterinary Microbiology, vol. 222, pp. 69-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.06.018
Raya, Adam P. ; Jaffe, David A. ; Chomel, Bruno B ; Ota, Marissa S. ; Tsou, Peter M. ; Davis, Aaron Z. ; Olave-Leyva, José Ignacio ; Galvez-Romero, Guillermo ; Stuckey, Matthew J. ; Kasten, Rickie W. ; Obregón-Morales, Cirani ; Aréchiga-Ceballos, Nidia ; Martinez-Martinez, Flor ; Aguilar-Setién, Alvaro. / Detection of Bartonella species, including Candidatus Bartonella ovis sp. nov, in ruminants from Mexico and lack of evidence of Bartonella DNA in saliva of common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) predating on them. In: Veterinary Microbiology. 2018 ; Vol. 222. pp. 69-74.
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abstract = "Bartonella spp. have been identified in many bat species worldwide, including the zoonotic species, Candidatus Bartonella mayotimonensis. The common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) preys preferentially on livestock in Latin America and is frequently infected with Bartonella spp. To determine the potential role of D. rotundus in transmitting Bartonella to livestock, common vampire bats and bat-bitten domestic ruminants from Mexico were tested for Bartonella infection by blood culture or conventional PCR. Furthermore, to explore the possibility of bite transmission during blood feeding, saliva swabs from 35 D. rotundus known to be either Bartonella bacteremic (N = 17) or blood culture negative (N = 18) were tested by PCR to detect the presence of Bartonella DNA. Twenty (17.1{\%}) of 117 sheep and 16 (34.8{\%}) of 46 cattle were Bartonella bacteremic by PCR testing. However, none of them were infected with Bartonella strains previously isolated from vampire bats and none of the 35 D. rotundus saliva swabs tested were PCR positive for Bartonella. All but two animals among those which were Bartonella culture and/or PCR positive, were infected with either B. bovis (cattle) or B. melophagi (sheep). Two sheep were infected by a possible new species, Candidatus Bartonella ovis, being phylogenetically closer to B. bovis than B. melophagi. This study does not support the role of D. rotundus as a reservoir of Bartonella species infecting livestock, which could be transmitted via bite and blood feeding and therefore suggest limited risk of zoonotic transmission of Bartonella from common vampire bats to humans.",
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