Designing bioactive delivery systems for tissue regeneration

Hillary E. Davis, Jonathan K Leach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The direct infusion of macromolecules into defect sites generally does not impart adequate physiological responses. Without the protection of delivery systems, inductive molecules may likely redistribute away from their desired locale and are vulnerable to degradation. In order to achieve efficacy, large doses supplied at interval time periods are necessary, often at great expense and ensuing detrimental side effects. The selection of a delivery system plays an important role in the rate of re-growth and functionality of regenerating tissue: not only do the release kinetics of inductive molecules and their consequent bioactivities need to be considered, but also how the delivery system interacts and integrates with its surrounding host environment. In the current review, we describe the means of release of macromolecules from hydrogels, polymeric microspheres, and porous scaffolds along with the selection and utilization of bioactive delivery systems in a variety of tissue-engineering strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalAnnals of Biomedical Engineering
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Fingerprint

Tissue regeneration
Macromolecules
Molecules
Bioactivity
Microspheres
Tissue engineering
Hydrogels
Scaffolds
Tissue
Degradation
Defects
Kinetics

Keywords

  • Delivery vehicles
  • Diffusion
  • Growth factors
  • Hydrogels
  • Microspheres
  • Recombinant proteins
  • Scaffolds
  • Tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Designing bioactive delivery systems for tissue regeneration. / Davis, Hillary E.; Leach, Jonathan K.

In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davis, Hillary E. ; Leach, Jonathan K. / Designing bioactive delivery systems for tissue regeneration. In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering. 2011 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 1-13.
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