Design and validation of a closed loop variable hydrostatic pressure cytochamber

K. A. Athanasiou, D. Lanctot, G. Constantinides

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Mechanical forces significantly affect growth, repair, and maintenance of the musculoskeletal system. Hydrostatic pressure is a type of force that most cells experience in vivo. In order to elucidate the mechanism of hydrostatic pressure effects on tissue culture cells, we designed and fabricated an apparatus that allows accurate pressurization at constant temperature. This cytochamber system was validated in three separate studies, in which cultured osteoblast-like cells were subjected to pre-described continuous pressure profiles at 37°C. These validation studies indicate that; a) Pressurization at 4MPa for 20 minutes induces significant cytoskeletal changes, as evidenced by tubulin and actin depolymerization, and increased adhesion at cellular interfaces. b) This pressurization also affects localization and staining of heat-shock proteins. c) A window of hydrostatic pressure, between 1. 5 to 2.5 MPa and applied continuously for two hours, exists that induces increased DNA synthesis. d) Other magnitudes of hydrostatic pressure (0.1, 2.0, and 6.0MPa) applied for two hours may enhance mineralization, as evidenced by significant increases in alkaline phosphatase. This closed-loop cytochamber allows the study of cell metabolism in response to hydrostatic pressure and demonstrates that this type of mechanical loading plays an important role in cell mechanotransduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED
EditorsJohn M. Tarbell
Place of PublicationNew York, NY, United States
PublisherPubl by ASME
Pages415-418
Number of pages4
Volume26
ISBN (Print)0791810313
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1993 ASME Winter Annual Meeting - New Orleans, LA, USA
Duration: Nov 28 1993Dec 3 1993

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1993 ASME Winter Annual Meeting
CityNew Orleans, LA, USA
Period11/28/9312/3/93

Fingerprint

Hydrostatic pressure
Pressurization
Musculoskeletal system
Tissue culture
Depolymerization
Pressure effects
Osteoblasts
Phosphatases
Metabolism
DNA
Repair
Adhesion
Proteins
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Athanasiou, K. A., Lanctot, D., & Constantinides, G. (1993). Design and validation of a closed loop variable hydrostatic pressure cytochamber. In J. M. Tarbell (Ed.), American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED (Vol. 26, pp. 415-418). New York, NY, United States: Publ by ASME.

Design and validation of a closed loop variable hydrostatic pressure cytochamber. / Athanasiou, K. A.; Lanctot, D.; Constantinides, G.

American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. ed. / John M. Tarbell. Vol. 26 New York, NY, United States : Publ by ASME, 1993. p. 415-418.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Athanasiou, KA, Lanctot, D & Constantinides, G 1993, Design and validation of a closed loop variable hydrostatic pressure cytochamber. in JM Tarbell (ed.), American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. vol. 26, Publ by ASME, New York, NY, United States, pp. 415-418, Proceedings of the 1993 ASME Winter Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, USA, 11/28/93.
Athanasiou KA, Lanctot D, Constantinides G. Design and validation of a closed loop variable hydrostatic pressure cytochamber. In Tarbell JM, editor, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. Vol. 26. New York, NY, United States: Publ by ASME. 1993. p. 415-418
Athanasiou, K. A. ; Lanctot, D. ; Constantinides, G. / Design and validation of a closed loop variable hydrostatic pressure cytochamber. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. editor / John M. Tarbell. Vol. 26 New York, NY, United States : Publ by ASME, 1993. pp. 415-418
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