Design and methods of a randomized trial testing the novel Wellness Intervention for Smokers Living with HIV (WISH)

Jennifer B. McClure, Sheryl L. Catz, Clementine Chalal, Ryan Ciuffetelli, Scott Coggeshall, Rian J. DeFaccio, Sara Fleehart, Jaimee L. Heffner, Ella Thompson, Emily C. Williams, Kristina Crothers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Smoking rates are disproportionately high among people living with HIV. Smokers living with HIV (SLWH) are also largely unaware of the HIV-specific deleterious effects of smoking and often lack motivation and confidence in their ability to quit tobacco. To address these issues, we developed the Wellness Intervention for Smokers Living with HIV (WISH). WISH is grounded in the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) Model and is designed for all SLWH, regardless of their initial motivation to quit. It follows evidence-based, best practice guidelines for nicotine dependence treatment, but is innovative in its use of a comprehensive wellness approach that addresses smoking within the context of HIV self-management including treatment adherence and engagement, stress management, substance use, and other personally relevant health behavior goals. The described randomized trial will enroll SLWH who are receiving care at Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers and compare WISH's impact on smoking behavior to standard care services offered through the National VA Quitline and SmokefreeVET texting program. It will also assess intervention impact on markers of immune status and mortality risk. If effective, WISH could be disseminated to Veterans nationwide and could serve as a model for designing quitline interventions for other smokers who are ambivalent about quitting. The current paper outlines the rationale and methodology of the WISH trial, one of a series of studies recently funded by the National Cancer Institute to advance understanding of how to better promote smoking cessation among SLWH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106486
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume110
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Counseling
  • HIV
  • Smoking cessation
  • Text messaging
  • Tobacco
  • Veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

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