Design and benchmark testing for open architecture reconfigurable mobile spirometer and exhaled breath monitor with GPS and data telemetry

Alexander G. Fung, Laren D. Tan, Theresa N. Duong, Michael Schivo, Leslie Littlefield, Jean Pierre Delplanque, Cristina E. Davis, Nicholas J. Kenyon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Portable and wearable medical instruments are poised to play an increasingly important role in health monitoring. Mobile spirometers are available commercially, and are used to monitor patients with advanced lung disease. However, these commercial monitors have a fixed product architecture determined by the manufacturer, and researchers cannot easily experiment with new configurations or add additional novel sensors over time. Spirometry combined with exhaled breath metabolite monitoring has the potential to transform healthcare and improve clinical management strategies. This research provides an updated design and benchmark testing for a flexible, portable, open access architecture to measure lung function, using common Arduino/Android microcontroller technologies. To demonstrate the feasibility and the proof-of-concept of this easily-adaptable platform technology, we had 43 subjects (healthy, and those with lung diseases) perform three spirometry maneuvers using our reconfigurable device and an office-based commercial spirometer. We found that our system compared favorably with the traditional spirometer, with high accuracy and agreement for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC), and gas measurements were feasible. This provides an adaptable/reconfigurable open access “personalized medicine” platform for researchers and patients, and new chemical sensors and other modular instrumentation can extend the flexibility of the device in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100
JournalDiagnostics
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

Fingerprint

Reconfigurable architectures
Benchmarking
Telemetry
Pulmonary diseases
Spirometry
Telemetering
Lung Diseases
Global positioning system
Research Personnel
Technology
Gas fuel measurement
Equipment and Supplies
Precision Medicine
Monitoring
Vital Capacity
Forced Expiratory Volume
Testing
Microcontrollers
Metabolites
Chemical sensors

Keywords

  • Breath analysis
  • Personalized medicine
  • Spirometry
  • Telehealth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Design and benchmark testing for open architecture reconfigurable mobile spirometer and exhaled breath monitor with GPS and data telemetry. / Fung, Alexander G.; Tan, Laren D.; Duong, Theresa N.; Schivo, Michael; Littlefield, Leslie; Delplanque, Jean Pierre; Davis, Cristina E.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

In: Diagnostics, Vol. 9, No. 3, 100, 01.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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