Depression of colony formation by human thymus-derived lymphocytes with rifampin and other antimicrobial agents

K. A. Scharre, D. D. Eckels, M. Eric Gershwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Colonies of human lymphocytes with thymus-derived (T) cell characteristics can be induced by phytohemagglutinin P to grow in a semisolid medium. To expand the data base on the effects of antimicrobial agents on cell-mediated immunity, the effect of 30 antimicrobial agents on T-lymphocyte cloning was studied. All of the drugs were added to the cultures in concentrations ranging from 10-5 to 10-14 M, and the results were compared with those in cultures without the drug. Drugs that inhibit protein synthesis at the 50S ribosomal subunit in bacteria - in particular, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, and troleandomycin - suppressed colony formation. However, the most significantly immunosuppressive agent was rifampin; it suppressed colony formation at concentrations of up to 2.5 x 10-9 M, a value significantly lower than that found in previous in vitro testing and well below therapeutic levels. Screening of drugs by lymphocyte cloning techniques for possible suppression of cell-mediated immunity appears to be a rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)832-835
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume143
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1981

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

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