Depression is associated with increased severity of co-morbidities in bariatric surgical candidates

Mohamed R Ali, Jason J. Rasmussen, Jeffrey B. Monash, William D. Fuller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Depression is prevalent among bariatric surgical patients, and previous studies have suggested a link between depression and quality of life. Our objective was to examine the relationship between depression and other co-morbidities of obesity at a university hospital in the United States. Methods: Data were collected from 1368 consecutive patients evaluated for bariatric surgery. The demographic and co-morbidity profiles of these patients were compared between the depressed and nondepressed individuals. Depression was defined as an Assessment of Obesity-Related Co-morbidities score of ≥3, signifying that the patient required medical treatment for (score of 3) or had complications of (score of 4-5) depression. Results: The prevalence of depression among these patients was 36%. The mean age of the patients with depression was older (44.3 ± 9.4 versus 42.2 ± 9.6, P <.05), but the mean body mass index was similar. Depression was more prevalent among the female patients (37.4% versus 29.6%, P <.05). Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, polycystic ovarian syndrome, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome occurred with similar frequency and severity in persons with and without depression. The analysis revealed a significantly greater prevalence and severity of dyslipidemia (P <.05), gastroesophageal reflux disease (P <.05), back pain (P <.0001), joint pain (P <.05), sleep apnea (P <.01), stress incontinence (P <.01), and hernia (P <.05) among patients with depression. Overall, patients with depression had more co-morbidities per patient (5.46 versus 4.55) and a greater likelihood of severe or complicated co-morbidities (2.67 versus 1.89 per patient). Conclusion: This report has characterized a link between depression and other co-morbidities in bariatric surgical patients. This association was independent of the body mass index. Although a causal relationship could not yet be identified, our findings indicate that depression, in this patient population, is associated with a greater prevalence and increased severity of medical co-morbidities that express distinct physical symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)559-564
Number of pages6
JournalSurgery for Obesity and Related Diseases
Volume5
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

Fingerprint

Bariatrics
Depression
Morbidity
Body Mass Index
Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome
Obesity
Pseudotumor Cerebri
Bariatric Surgery
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Arthralgia
Back Pain
Hernia
Dyslipidemias
Gastroesophageal Reflux

Keywords

  • Bariatric surgery
  • Co-morbidities
  • Depression
  • Laparoscopy
  • Morbid obesity
  • Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Depression is associated with increased severity of co-morbidities in bariatric surgical candidates. / Ali, Mohamed R; Rasmussen, Jason J.; Monash, Jeffrey B.; Fuller, William D.

In: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, Vol. 5, No. 5, 09.2009, p. 559-564.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ali, Mohamed R ; Rasmussen, Jason J. ; Monash, Jeffrey B. ; Fuller, William D. / Depression is associated with increased severity of co-morbidities in bariatric surgical candidates. In: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases. 2009 ; Vol. 5, No. 5. pp. 559-564.
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AU - Fuller, William D.

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N2 - Background: Depression is prevalent among bariatric surgical patients, and previous studies have suggested a link between depression and quality of life. Our objective was to examine the relationship between depression and other co-morbidities of obesity at a university hospital in the United States. Methods: Data were collected from 1368 consecutive patients evaluated for bariatric surgery. The demographic and co-morbidity profiles of these patients were compared between the depressed and nondepressed individuals. Depression was defined as an Assessment of Obesity-Related Co-morbidities score of ≥3, signifying that the patient required medical treatment for (score of 3) or had complications of (score of 4-5) depression. Results: The prevalence of depression among these patients was 36%. The mean age of the patients with depression was older (44.3 ± 9.4 versus 42.2 ± 9.6, P <.05), but the mean body mass index was similar. Depression was more prevalent among the female patients (37.4% versus 29.6%, P <.05). Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, polycystic ovarian syndrome, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome occurred with similar frequency and severity in persons with and without depression. The analysis revealed a significantly greater prevalence and severity of dyslipidemia (P <.05), gastroesophageal reflux disease (P <.05), back pain (P <.0001), joint pain (P <.05), sleep apnea (P <.01), stress incontinence (P <.01), and hernia (P <.05) among patients with depression. Overall, patients with depression had more co-morbidities per patient (5.46 versus 4.55) and a greater likelihood of severe or complicated co-morbidities (2.67 versus 1.89 per patient). Conclusion: This report has characterized a link between depression and other co-morbidities in bariatric surgical patients. This association was independent of the body mass index. Although a causal relationship could not yet be identified, our findings indicate that depression, in this patient population, is associated with a greater prevalence and increased severity of medical co-morbidities that express distinct physical symptoms.

AB - Background: Depression is prevalent among bariatric surgical patients, and previous studies have suggested a link between depression and quality of life. Our objective was to examine the relationship between depression and other co-morbidities of obesity at a university hospital in the United States. Methods: Data were collected from 1368 consecutive patients evaluated for bariatric surgery. The demographic and co-morbidity profiles of these patients were compared between the depressed and nondepressed individuals. Depression was defined as an Assessment of Obesity-Related Co-morbidities score of ≥3, signifying that the patient required medical treatment for (score of 3) or had complications of (score of 4-5) depression. Results: The prevalence of depression among these patients was 36%. The mean age of the patients with depression was older (44.3 ± 9.4 versus 42.2 ± 9.6, P <.05), but the mean body mass index was similar. Depression was more prevalent among the female patients (37.4% versus 29.6%, P <.05). Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, polycystic ovarian syndrome, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome occurred with similar frequency and severity in persons with and without depression. The analysis revealed a significantly greater prevalence and severity of dyslipidemia (P <.05), gastroesophageal reflux disease (P <.05), back pain (P <.0001), joint pain (P <.05), sleep apnea (P <.01), stress incontinence (P <.01), and hernia (P <.05) among patients with depression. Overall, patients with depression had more co-morbidities per patient (5.46 versus 4.55) and a greater likelihood of severe or complicated co-morbidities (2.67 versus 1.89 per patient). Conclusion: This report has characterized a link between depression and other co-morbidities in bariatric surgical patients. This association was independent of the body mass index. Although a causal relationship could not yet be identified, our findings indicate that depression, in this patient population, is associated with a greater prevalence and increased severity of medical co-morbidities that express distinct physical symptoms.

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