Defining the acute care surgery curriculum

Therese M. Duane, Christopher J. Dente, John J. Fildes, Kimberly A. Davis, Gregory Jurkovich, J. Wayne Meredith, L. D. Britt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: This study was designed to define the gaps in essential and desirable (E/D) case volumes that may prompt reevaluation of the acute care surgery (ACS) curriculum or restructuring of the training provided. Methods: A review of the first 2 years of ACS case log entry (July 2011 to June 2013) was performed. Individual trainee logs were evaluated to determine how often they performed each case on the E/D list. Trainees described cases using current procedural terminology codes, which had been previously mapped to the E/D list. Results: There were 29 trainees from 15 programs (Year 1) and 30 trainees from 13 programs (Year 2) who participated in case log entry, with some overlap between the years. There were a total of 487 fellow-months of data with an average of 14.6 current procedural terminology codes per month and 175.5 per year for cases on the E/D list versus 12 and 143.5 for cases not on the E/D list, respectively. Overall, the most common essential cases were laparotomy for trauma (1,463; 705 in Year 1, 758 in Year 2), tracheostomy (665; 372 in Year 1, 293 in Year 2) and gastrostomy tubes (566; 289 in Year 1, 277 in Year 2). There are a total of 73 types of essential operations and 45 types of desirable operations in the current curriculum. Therewere 16 distinct codes (13.6%) never used, of which 6 overlapped with other codes. Based on body region, the 10 E/D codes never used by any fellow were as follows: one head/face, lateral canthotomy; five neck; elective neck dissections; one thoracic, vascular trauma to chest; three pediatrics, inguinal hernia repair and small bowel obstruction treatments. Conclusion: The current ACS trainees lack adequate head/neck and pediatric experience as defined by the ACS curriculum. Restructuring rotations at individual institutions and a focus on novel educational modalities may be needed to augment the individual institutional exposure. Reevaluation of the curriculum may be warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-264
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Volume78
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acute care surgery
  • Case log
  • Curriculum
  • Fellowship

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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  • Cite this

    Duane, T. M., Dente, C. J., Fildes, J. J., Davis, K. A., Jurkovich, G., Meredith, J. W., & Britt, L. D. (2015). Defining the acute care surgery curriculum. Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, 78(2), 259-264. https://doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000000522