Decreased levels of total immunoglobulin in children with autism are not a result of B cell dysfunction

Luke S. Heuer, Melissa Rose, Paul Ashwood, Judith A Van de Water

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorders are a heterogeneous group of behaviorally defined disorders having complex etiologies. We previously reported a direct correlation between lower plasma levels of the immunoglobulins (Ig) IgG and IgM and increased severity of behavioral symptoms in children with autism. Our current objective was to determine if these reduced plasma levels of IgG and IgM are the result of defective B cell development, activation, or function. Results suggest no differences in the B cell parameters measured, indicating that decreased Ig in autism is not a result of B cell dysfunction and other immune cells might be involved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-102
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neuroimmunology
Volume251
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2012

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
Immunoglobulins
B-Lymphocytes
Immunoglobulin M
Immunoglobulin G
Behavioral Symptoms

Keywords

  • Autism
  • B cell
  • Immune system
  • Immunoglobulin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Neurology

Cite this

Decreased levels of total immunoglobulin in children with autism are not a result of B cell dysfunction. / Heuer, Luke S.; Rose, Melissa; Ashwood, Paul; Van de Water, Judith A.

In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, Vol. 251, No. 1-2, 15.10.2012, p. 94-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f09655e55108435da171b7b09a0e9b2f,
title = "Decreased levels of total immunoglobulin in children with autism are not a result of B cell dysfunction",
abstract = "Autism spectrum disorders are a heterogeneous group of behaviorally defined disorders having complex etiologies. We previously reported a direct correlation between lower plasma levels of the immunoglobulins (Ig) IgG and IgM and increased severity of behavioral symptoms in children with autism. Our current objective was to determine if these reduced plasma levels of IgG and IgM are the result of defective B cell development, activation, or function. Results suggest no differences in the B cell parameters measured, indicating that decreased Ig in autism is not a result of B cell dysfunction and other immune cells might be involved.",
keywords = "Autism, B cell, Immune system, Immunoglobulin",
author = "Heuer, {Luke S.} and Melissa Rose and Paul Ashwood and {Van de Water}, {Judith A}",
year = "2012",
month = "10",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.jneuroim.2012.07.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "251",
pages = "94--102",
journal = "Journal of Neuroimmunology",
issn = "0165-5728",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1-2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Decreased levels of total immunoglobulin in children with autism are not a result of B cell dysfunction

AU - Heuer, Luke S.

AU - Rose, Melissa

AU - Ashwood, Paul

AU - Van de Water, Judith A

PY - 2012/10/15

Y1 - 2012/10/15

N2 - Autism spectrum disorders are a heterogeneous group of behaviorally defined disorders having complex etiologies. We previously reported a direct correlation between lower plasma levels of the immunoglobulins (Ig) IgG and IgM and increased severity of behavioral symptoms in children with autism. Our current objective was to determine if these reduced plasma levels of IgG and IgM are the result of defective B cell development, activation, or function. Results suggest no differences in the B cell parameters measured, indicating that decreased Ig in autism is not a result of B cell dysfunction and other immune cells might be involved.

AB - Autism spectrum disorders are a heterogeneous group of behaviorally defined disorders having complex etiologies. We previously reported a direct correlation between lower plasma levels of the immunoglobulins (Ig) IgG and IgM and increased severity of behavioral symptoms in children with autism. Our current objective was to determine if these reduced plasma levels of IgG and IgM are the result of defective B cell development, activation, or function. Results suggest no differences in the B cell parameters measured, indicating that decreased Ig in autism is not a result of B cell dysfunction and other immune cells might be involved.

KW - Autism

KW - B cell

KW - Immune system

KW - Immunoglobulin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84865648884&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84865648884&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jneuroim.2012.07.001

DO - 10.1016/j.jneuroim.2012.07.001

M3 - Article

C2 - 22854260

AN - SCOPUS:84865648884

VL - 251

SP - 94

EP - 102

JO - Journal of Neuroimmunology

JF - Journal of Neuroimmunology

SN - 0165-5728

IS - 1-2

ER -