Deafness among physicians and trainees: A national survey

Christopher J. Moreland, Darin Latimore, Ananda Sen, Nora Arato, Philip Zazove

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To describe the characteristics of and accommodations used by the deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHoH) physician and trainee population and examine whether these individuals are more likely to care for DHoH patients. METHOD: Multipronged snowball sampling identified 86 potential DHoH physician and trainee participants. In July to September 2010, a Web-based survey investigated accommodations used by survey respondents. The authors analyzed participants' demographics, accommodation and career satisfaction, sense of institutional support, likelihood of recommending medicine as a career, and current/anticipated DHoH patient population size. RESULTS: The response rate was 65% (56 respondents; 31 trainees and 25 practicing physicians). Modified stethoscopes were the most frequently used accommodation (n = 50; 89%); other accommodations included auditory equipment, note-taking, computer-assisted real-time captioning, signed interpretation, and oral interpretation. Most respondents reported that their accommodations met their needs well, although 2 spent up to 10 hours weekly arranging accommodations. Of 25 physicians, 17 reported primary care specialties; 7 of 31 trainees planned to enter primary care specialties. Over 20% of trainees anticipated working with DHoH patients, whereas physicians on average spent 10% of their time with DHoH patients. Physicians' accommodation satisfaction was positively associated with career satisfaction and recommending medicine as a career. CONCLUSIONS: DHoH physicians and trainees seemed satisfied with frequent, multimodal accommodations from employers and educators. These results may assist organizations in planning accommodation provisions. Because DHoH physicians and trainees seem interested in primary care and serving DHoH patients, recruiting and training DHoH physicians has implications for the care of this underserved population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)224-232
Number of pages9
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume88
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

Fingerprint

deafness
Deafness
trainee
accommodation
Hearing
physician
Physicians
career
Primary Health Care
Medicine
Surveys and Questionnaires
medicine
Stethoscopes
interpretation
Vulnerable Populations
Population Density
employer
Demography
Organizations
educator

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Moreland, C. J., Latimore, D., Sen, A., Arato, N., & Zazove, P. (2013). Deafness among physicians and trainees: A national survey. Academic Medicine, 88(2), 224-232. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e31827c0d60

Deafness among physicians and trainees : A national survey. / Moreland, Christopher J.; Latimore, Darin; Sen, Ananda; Arato, Nora; Zazove, Philip.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 88, No. 2, 02.2013, p. 224-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moreland, CJ, Latimore, D, Sen, A, Arato, N & Zazove, P 2013, 'Deafness among physicians and trainees: A national survey', Academic Medicine, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 224-232. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e31827c0d60
Moreland CJ, Latimore D, Sen A, Arato N, Zazove P. Deafness among physicians and trainees: A national survey. Academic Medicine. 2013 Feb;88(2):224-232. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e31827c0d60
Moreland, Christopher J. ; Latimore, Darin ; Sen, Ananda ; Arato, Nora ; Zazove, Philip. / Deafness among physicians and trainees : A national survey. In: Academic Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 88, No. 2. pp. 224-232.
@article{3c9358a7c6264d559424467ba145714a,
title = "Deafness among physicians and trainees: A national survey",
abstract = "Purpose: To describe the characteristics of and accommodations used by the deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHoH) physician and trainee population and examine whether these individuals are more likely to care for DHoH patients. METHOD: Multipronged snowball sampling identified 86 potential DHoH physician and trainee participants. In July to September 2010, a Web-based survey investigated accommodations used by survey respondents. The authors analyzed participants' demographics, accommodation and career satisfaction, sense of institutional support, likelihood of recommending medicine as a career, and current/anticipated DHoH patient population size. RESULTS: The response rate was 65{\%} (56 respondents; 31 trainees and 25 practicing physicians). Modified stethoscopes were the most frequently used accommodation (n = 50; 89{\%}); other accommodations included auditory equipment, note-taking, computer-assisted real-time captioning, signed interpretation, and oral interpretation. Most respondents reported that their accommodations met their needs well, although 2 spent up to 10 hours weekly arranging accommodations. Of 25 physicians, 17 reported primary care specialties; 7 of 31 trainees planned to enter primary care specialties. Over 20{\%} of trainees anticipated working with DHoH patients, whereas physicians on average spent 10{\%} of their time with DHoH patients. Physicians' accommodation satisfaction was positively associated with career satisfaction and recommending medicine as a career. CONCLUSIONS: DHoH physicians and trainees seemed satisfied with frequent, multimodal accommodations from employers and educators. These results may assist organizations in planning accommodation provisions. Because DHoH physicians and trainees seem interested in primary care and serving DHoH patients, recruiting and training DHoH physicians has implications for the care of this underserved population.",
author = "Moreland, {Christopher J.} and Darin Latimore and Ananda Sen and Nora Arato and Philip Zazove",
year = "2013",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1097/ACM.0b013e31827c0d60",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "88",
pages = "224--232",
journal = "Academic Medicine",
issn = "1040-2446",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Deafness among physicians and trainees

T2 - A national survey

AU - Moreland, Christopher J.

AU - Latimore, Darin

AU - Sen, Ananda

AU - Arato, Nora

AU - Zazove, Philip

PY - 2013/2

Y1 - 2013/2

N2 - Purpose: To describe the characteristics of and accommodations used by the deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHoH) physician and trainee population and examine whether these individuals are more likely to care for DHoH patients. METHOD: Multipronged snowball sampling identified 86 potential DHoH physician and trainee participants. In July to September 2010, a Web-based survey investigated accommodations used by survey respondents. The authors analyzed participants' demographics, accommodation and career satisfaction, sense of institutional support, likelihood of recommending medicine as a career, and current/anticipated DHoH patient population size. RESULTS: The response rate was 65% (56 respondents; 31 trainees and 25 practicing physicians). Modified stethoscopes were the most frequently used accommodation (n = 50; 89%); other accommodations included auditory equipment, note-taking, computer-assisted real-time captioning, signed interpretation, and oral interpretation. Most respondents reported that their accommodations met their needs well, although 2 spent up to 10 hours weekly arranging accommodations. Of 25 physicians, 17 reported primary care specialties; 7 of 31 trainees planned to enter primary care specialties. Over 20% of trainees anticipated working with DHoH patients, whereas physicians on average spent 10% of their time with DHoH patients. Physicians' accommodation satisfaction was positively associated with career satisfaction and recommending medicine as a career. CONCLUSIONS: DHoH physicians and trainees seemed satisfied with frequent, multimodal accommodations from employers and educators. These results may assist organizations in planning accommodation provisions. Because DHoH physicians and trainees seem interested in primary care and serving DHoH patients, recruiting and training DHoH physicians has implications for the care of this underserved population.

AB - Purpose: To describe the characteristics of and accommodations used by the deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHoH) physician and trainee population and examine whether these individuals are more likely to care for DHoH patients. METHOD: Multipronged snowball sampling identified 86 potential DHoH physician and trainee participants. In July to September 2010, a Web-based survey investigated accommodations used by survey respondents. The authors analyzed participants' demographics, accommodation and career satisfaction, sense of institutional support, likelihood of recommending medicine as a career, and current/anticipated DHoH patient population size. RESULTS: The response rate was 65% (56 respondents; 31 trainees and 25 practicing physicians). Modified stethoscopes were the most frequently used accommodation (n = 50; 89%); other accommodations included auditory equipment, note-taking, computer-assisted real-time captioning, signed interpretation, and oral interpretation. Most respondents reported that their accommodations met their needs well, although 2 spent up to 10 hours weekly arranging accommodations. Of 25 physicians, 17 reported primary care specialties; 7 of 31 trainees planned to enter primary care specialties. Over 20% of trainees anticipated working with DHoH patients, whereas physicians on average spent 10% of their time with DHoH patients. Physicians' accommodation satisfaction was positively associated with career satisfaction and recommending medicine as a career. CONCLUSIONS: DHoH physicians and trainees seemed satisfied with frequent, multimodal accommodations from employers and educators. These results may assist organizations in planning accommodation provisions. Because DHoH physicians and trainees seem interested in primary care and serving DHoH patients, recruiting and training DHoH physicians has implications for the care of this underserved population.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84873375482&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84873375482&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/ACM.0b013e31827c0d60

DO - 10.1097/ACM.0b013e31827c0d60

M3 - Article

C2 - 23269300

AN - SCOPUS:84873375482

VL - 88

SP - 224

EP - 232

JO - Academic Medicine

JF - Academic Medicine

SN - 1040-2446

IS - 2

ER -