Daily spontaneous running attenuated the central gain of the arterial baroreflex

Chao-Yin Chen, S. E. DiCarlo, T. J. Scislo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Exercise training attenuates arterial baroreflex function. Mechanisms responsible may include an attenuated aortic baroreceptor reactivity (afferent mechanisms) and/or an attenuated central baroreflex gain. We tested the hypothesis that the aortic baroreceptor reactivity and/or central gain is attenuated by daily spontaneous running (DSR). Eighteen anesthetized Sprague- Dawley rats (11 control and 7 DSR) were tracheotomized and instrumented with femoral venous and right carotid arterial catheters. Electrodes were placed around the left aortic depressor nerve and the lumbar sympathetic trunk. Eight to thirteen weeks of DSR were associated with a 20% increase in heart weight-to-body weight ratio (2.83 ± 0.04 vs. 3.39 ± 0.10 g/kg; P < 0.001) and resting bradycardia (413 ± 6 vs. 384 ± 10 beats/min; P = 0.01). DSR reduced the central gain of the baroreflex regulation of heart rate (0.210 ± 0.046 vs. 0.005 ± 0.021 beats · min-1 · %-1; P = 0.004) during decreases in arterial pressure. However, the reactivity of aortic baroreceptor afferents and the central gain of the baroreflex control of lumbar sympathetic nerve activity were not different in control and DSR rats. Thus DSR reduced the central gain of the arterial baroreflex regulation of heart rate without changing the reactivity of aortic baroreceptor afferents. We conclude that afferent mechanisms are not responsible for the training- induced reduction in arterial baroreflex function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume268
Issue number2 37-2
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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