Daily relative dog abundance, fecal density, and loading rates on intensively and minimally managed dog-friendly beaches in central California

Stori C. Oates, Melissa A. Miller, Dane Hardin, Clare Dominik, David Jessup, Woutrina A Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Due to increased concerns regarding fecal pollution at marine recreational beaches, daily relative dog abundance and fecal density were estimated on an intensively managed (Beach 1) and a minimally managed (Beach 2) dog beach in Monterey County, California. Fecal loading and factors predictive of fecal deposition also were assessed. After standardizing for beach area, daily beach use and fecal densities did not differ between beaches and yearly fecal loading estimates revealed that unrecovered dog feces likely contributes significantly to fecal contamination (1.4 and 0.2. metric. tonnes/beach). Detection of feces was significantly associated with beach management type, transect position relative to mean low tideline, presence of beach wrack, distance to the nearest beach entrance, and season. Methodologies outlined in this study can augment monitoring programs at coastal beaches to optimize management, assess visitor compliance, and improve coastal water quality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Keywords

  • Dog feces
  • Fecal density
  • Fecal loading
  • Non-point pollution sources
  • Recreational beach
  • Relative dog abundance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Pollution

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