Daily cholecalciferol supplementation during pregnancy alters markers of regulatory immunity, inflammation, and clinical outcomes in a randomized controlled trial

Melissa S. Zerofsky, Bryon N. Jacoby, Theresa L. Pedersen, Charles B. Stephensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Vitamin D deficiency is widespread in pregnancy and has been associated with adverse health conditions in mothers and infants. Vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy may support the maintenance of pregnancy by its effects on innate and adaptive immunity. Objective: We assessed the effects of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy on vitamin D status and markers of immune function associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Methods: We conducted a randomized, controlled, double-blind intervention of 2 doses of cholecalciferol (400 and 2000 IU/d) from < 20 wk to delivery in 57 pregnant women. Vitamin D status, regulatory and inflammatory T cells, markers of innate immunity and systemic inflammation, and clinical outcomes including maternal blood pressure and birth weight were assessed at 26 and 36 wk of pregnancy. Results: Supplementation with 2000 IU/d vitamin D had a greater effect on the change in vitamin D status over pregnancy (P < 0.0001) and the final value at 36wk (P < 0.0001) than 400 IU/d, increasing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D from 81.1 nmol/L at baseline to 116 nmol/L at 36 wk and from 69.6 nmol/L at baseline to 85.6 nmol/L at 36 wk, respectively. The 2000-IU/d group had 36% more interleukin-10+ regulatory CD4+ T cells at 36 wk than did the 400-IU/d group (P < 0.007). The daily intake of 2000 compared with 400 IU/d tended to dampen the pregnancy-related increase in diastolic blood pressure by 1.3-fold (P = 0.06) and increase birth weight by 8.6% (P = 0.06), but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Supplementation with 2000 IU/d is more effective at increasing vitamin D status in pregnant women than 400 IU/d and is associated with increased regulatory T cell immunity that may prevent adverse outcomes caused by excess inflammation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01417351.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2388-2397
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume146
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cholecalciferol
Vitamin D
Immunity
Randomized Controlled Trials
Inflammation
Pregnancy
Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Blood Pressure
Innate Immunity
Birth Weight
Pregnant Women
Mothers
Pregnancy Maintenance
Vitamin D Deficiency
Adaptive Immunity
Pregnancy Outcome
Interleukin-10
Biomarkers
Health
Serum

Keywords

  • Clinical trial
  • Cytokines
  • Pregnancy
  • T cell
  • Vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Daily cholecalciferol supplementation during pregnancy alters markers of regulatory immunity, inflammation, and clinical outcomes in a randomized controlled trial. / Zerofsky, Melissa S.; Jacoby, Bryon N.; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Stephensen, Charles B.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 146, No. 11, 2016, p. 2388-2397.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zerofsky, Melissa S. ; Jacoby, Bryon N. ; Pedersen, Theresa L. ; Stephensen, Charles B. / Daily cholecalciferol supplementation during pregnancy alters markers of regulatory immunity, inflammation, and clinical outcomes in a randomized controlled trial. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2016 ; Vol. 146, No. 11. pp. 2388-2397.
@article{98ab1c1bff2e4d12912e1a01f9f98e68,
title = "Daily cholecalciferol supplementation during pregnancy alters markers of regulatory immunity, inflammation, and clinical outcomes in a randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Background: Vitamin D deficiency is widespread in pregnancy and has been associated with adverse health conditions in mothers and infants. Vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy may support the maintenance of pregnancy by its effects on innate and adaptive immunity. Objective: We assessed the effects of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy on vitamin D status and markers of immune function associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Methods: We conducted a randomized, controlled, double-blind intervention of 2 doses of cholecalciferol (400 and 2000 IU/d) from < 20 wk to delivery in 57 pregnant women. Vitamin D status, regulatory and inflammatory T cells, markers of innate immunity and systemic inflammation, and clinical outcomes including maternal blood pressure and birth weight were assessed at 26 and 36 wk of pregnancy. Results: Supplementation with 2000 IU/d vitamin D had a greater effect on the change in vitamin D status over pregnancy (P < 0.0001) and the final value at 36wk (P < 0.0001) than 400 IU/d, increasing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D from 81.1 nmol/L at baseline to 116 nmol/L at 36 wk and from 69.6 nmol/L at baseline to 85.6 nmol/L at 36 wk, respectively. The 2000-IU/d group had 36{\%} more interleukin-10+ regulatory CD4+ T cells at 36 wk than did the 400-IU/d group (P < 0.007). The daily intake of 2000 compared with 400 IU/d tended to dampen the pregnancy-related increase in diastolic blood pressure by 1.3-fold (P = 0.06) and increase birth weight by 8.6{\%} (P = 0.06), but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Supplementation with 2000 IU/d is more effective at increasing vitamin D status in pregnant women than 400 IU/d and is associated with increased regulatory T cell immunity that may prevent adverse outcomes caused by excess inflammation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01417351.",
keywords = "Clinical trial, Cytokines, Pregnancy, T cell, Vitamin D",
author = "Zerofsky, {Melissa S.} and Jacoby, {Bryon N.} and Pedersen, {Theresa L.} and Stephensen, {Charles B.}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.3945/jn.116.231480",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "146",
pages = "2388--2397",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0022-3166",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Daily cholecalciferol supplementation during pregnancy alters markers of regulatory immunity, inflammation, and clinical outcomes in a randomized controlled trial

AU - Zerofsky, Melissa S.

AU - Jacoby, Bryon N.

AU - Pedersen, Theresa L.

AU - Stephensen, Charles B.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background: Vitamin D deficiency is widespread in pregnancy and has been associated with adverse health conditions in mothers and infants. Vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy may support the maintenance of pregnancy by its effects on innate and adaptive immunity. Objective: We assessed the effects of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy on vitamin D status and markers of immune function associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Methods: We conducted a randomized, controlled, double-blind intervention of 2 doses of cholecalciferol (400 and 2000 IU/d) from < 20 wk to delivery in 57 pregnant women. Vitamin D status, regulatory and inflammatory T cells, markers of innate immunity and systemic inflammation, and clinical outcomes including maternal blood pressure and birth weight were assessed at 26 and 36 wk of pregnancy. Results: Supplementation with 2000 IU/d vitamin D had a greater effect on the change in vitamin D status over pregnancy (P < 0.0001) and the final value at 36wk (P < 0.0001) than 400 IU/d, increasing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D from 81.1 nmol/L at baseline to 116 nmol/L at 36 wk and from 69.6 nmol/L at baseline to 85.6 nmol/L at 36 wk, respectively. The 2000-IU/d group had 36% more interleukin-10+ regulatory CD4+ T cells at 36 wk than did the 400-IU/d group (P < 0.007). The daily intake of 2000 compared with 400 IU/d tended to dampen the pregnancy-related increase in diastolic blood pressure by 1.3-fold (P = 0.06) and increase birth weight by 8.6% (P = 0.06), but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Supplementation with 2000 IU/d is more effective at increasing vitamin D status in pregnant women than 400 IU/d and is associated with increased regulatory T cell immunity that may prevent adverse outcomes caused by excess inflammation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01417351.

AB - Background: Vitamin D deficiency is widespread in pregnancy and has been associated with adverse health conditions in mothers and infants. Vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy may support the maintenance of pregnancy by its effects on innate and adaptive immunity. Objective: We assessed the effects of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy on vitamin D status and markers of immune function associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Methods: We conducted a randomized, controlled, double-blind intervention of 2 doses of cholecalciferol (400 and 2000 IU/d) from < 20 wk to delivery in 57 pregnant women. Vitamin D status, regulatory and inflammatory T cells, markers of innate immunity and systemic inflammation, and clinical outcomes including maternal blood pressure and birth weight were assessed at 26 and 36 wk of pregnancy. Results: Supplementation with 2000 IU/d vitamin D had a greater effect on the change in vitamin D status over pregnancy (P < 0.0001) and the final value at 36wk (P < 0.0001) than 400 IU/d, increasing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D from 81.1 nmol/L at baseline to 116 nmol/L at 36 wk and from 69.6 nmol/L at baseline to 85.6 nmol/L at 36 wk, respectively. The 2000-IU/d group had 36% more interleukin-10+ regulatory CD4+ T cells at 36 wk than did the 400-IU/d group (P < 0.007). The daily intake of 2000 compared with 400 IU/d tended to dampen the pregnancy-related increase in diastolic blood pressure by 1.3-fold (P = 0.06) and increase birth weight by 8.6% (P = 0.06), but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Supplementation with 2000 IU/d is more effective at increasing vitamin D status in pregnant women than 400 IU/d and is associated with increased regulatory T cell immunity that may prevent adverse outcomes caused by excess inflammation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01417351.

KW - Clinical trial

KW - Cytokines

KW - Pregnancy

KW - T cell

KW - Vitamin D

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84995529447&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84995529447&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3945/jn.116.231480

DO - 10.3945/jn.116.231480

M3 - Article

VL - 146

SP - 2388

EP - 2397

JO - Journal of Nutrition

JF - Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0022-3166

IS - 11

ER -