Cyclops lesions detected by MRI are frequent findings after ACL surgical reconstruction but do not impact clinical outcome over 2 years

UCSF-P50-ACL Consortium, AF-ACL Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the impact of cyclops lesions with MRI in patients treated for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears on clinical outcome. Methods: In 113 patients (age 29.8 ± 10.5y; 55 females; BMI 24.8 ± 3.7 kg/m2) with complete ACL tear, 3 T-MRI scans were obtained before, 6-months, 1-year (n = 75) and 2-years (n = 33) after ACL reconstruction. Presence and volume of cyclops lesions were assessed. Clinical outcomes were measured using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and differences between time points (∆KOOS) were calculated. Changes of KOOS subscales were compared between patients with and without cyclops lesion. KOOS was also correlated with lesion volume. Results: Cyclops lesions were found in 25% (28/113), 27% (20/75) and 33% (11/33) of patients after 6-months, 1- and 2-years, respectively. The lesion volume did not change significantly (P > 0.05) between time points, measuring 0.65 ± 0.59, 0.81 ± 0.70 and 0.72.9 ± 0.96 cm3, respectively. Clinical outcomes based on KOOS subscales were not significantly different in patients with cyclops lesions compared to those without cyclops lesions (each comparison P > 0.05), and no significant associations of clinical outcomes with lesion volume were found (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Neither presence nor size of cyclops lesions within the first 2-years after ACL surgery were associated with inferior clinical outcome. Key Points: • Cyclops lesions had a prevalence of 25% in patients after ACL reconstruction. • Subjects with cyclops lesions did not have an inferior clinical outcome. • Cyclops lesions developed within the first 6 months after surgery. • The size of cyclops lesions did not significantly change over a period of 2 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3499-3508
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Radiology
Volume27
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Minocycline
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
Knee Injuries
Knee Osteoarthritis
Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Anterior cruciate ligament tear
  • Clinical outcome
  • Cyclops lesions
  • KOOS score
  • MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Cyclops lesions detected by MRI are frequent findings after ACL surgical reconstruction but do not impact clinical outcome over 2 years. / UCSF-P50-ACL Consortium; AF-ACL Consortium.

In: European Radiology, Vol. 27, No. 8, 01.08.2017, p. 3499-3508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Cyclops lesions detected by MRI are frequent findings after ACL surgical reconstruction but do not impact clinical outcome over 2 years",
abstract = "Objectives: To assess the impact of cyclops lesions with MRI in patients treated for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears on clinical outcome. Methods: In 113 patients (age 29.8 ± 10.5y; 55 females; BMI 24.8 ± 3.7 kg/m2) with complete ACL tear, 3 T-MRI scans were obtained before, 6-months, 1-year (n = 75) and 2-years (n = 33) after ACL reconstruction. Presence and volume of cyclops lesions were assessed. Clinical outcomes were measured using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and differences between time points (∆KOOS) were calculated. Changes of KOOS subscales were compared between patients with and without cyclops lesion. KOOS was also correlated with lesion volume. Results: Cyclops lesions were found in 25{\%} (28/113), 27{\%} (20/75) and 33{\%} (11/33) of patients after 6-months, 1- and 2-years, respectively. The lesion volume did not change significantly (P > 0.05) between time points, measuring 0.65 ± 0.59, 0.81 ± 0.70 and 0.72.9 ± 0.96 cm3, respectively. Clinical outcomes based on KOOS subscales were not significantly different in patients with cyclops lesions compared to those without cyclops lesions (each comparison P > 0.05), and no significant associations of clinical outcomes with lesion volume were found (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Neither presence nor size of cyclops lesions within the first 2-years after ACL surgery were associated with inferior clinical outcome. Key Points: • Cyclops lesions had a prevalence of 25{\%} in patients after ACL reconstruction. • Subjects with cyclops lesions did not have an inferior clinical outcome. • Cyclops lesions developed within the first 6 months after surgery. • The size of cyclops lesions did not significantly change over a period of 2 years.",
keywords = "Anterior cruciate ligament tear, Clinical outcome, Cyclops lesions, KOOS score, MRI",
author = "{UCSF-P50-ACL Consortium} and {AF-ACL Consortium} and Luca Facchetti and Schwaiger, {Benedikt J.} and Gersing, {Alexandra S.} and Guimaraes, {Julio Brandao} and Lorenzo Nardo and Sharmila Majumdar and Ma, {Benjamin C.} and Link, {Thomas M.} and Xiaojuan Li",
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T1 - Cyclops lesions detected by MRI are frequent findings after ACL surgical reconstruction but do not impact clinical outcome over 2 years

AU - UCSF-P50-ACL Consortium

AU - AF-ACL Consortium

AU - Facchetti, Luca

AU - Schwaiger, Benedikt J.

AU - Gersing, Alexandra S.

AU - Guimaraes, Julio Brandao

AU - Nardo, Lorenzo

AU - Majumdar, Sharmila

AU - Ma, Benjamin C.

AU - Link, Thomas M.

AU - Li, Xiaojuan

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - Objectives: To assess the impact of cyclops lesions with MRI in patients treated for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears on clinical outcome. Methods: In 113 patients (age 29.8 ± 10.5y; 55 females; BMI 24.8 ± 3.7 kg/m2) with complete ACL tear, 3 T-MRI scans were obtained before, 6-months, 1-year (n = 75) and 2-years (n = 33) after ACL reconstruction. Presence and volume of cyclops lesions were assessed. Clinical outcomes were measured using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and differences between time points (∆KOOS) were calculated. Changes of KOOS subscales were compared between patients with and without cyclops lesion. KOOS was also correlated with lesion volume. Results: Cyclops lesions were found in 25% (28/113), 27% (20/75) and 33% (11/33) of patients after 6-months, 1- and 2-years, respectively. The lesion volume did not change significantly (P > 0.05) between time points, measuring 0.65 ± 0.59, 0.81 ± 0.70 and 0.72.9 ± 0.96 cm3, respectively. Clinical outcomes based on KOOS subscales were not significantly different in patients with cyclops lesions compared to those without cyclops lesions (each comparison P > 0.05), and no significant associations of clinical outcomes with lesion volume were found (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Neither presence nor size of cyclops lesions within the first 2-years after ACL surgery were associated with inferior clinical outcome. Key Points: • Cyclops lesions had a prevalence of 25% in patients after ACL reconstruction. • Subjects with cyclops lesions did not have an inferior clinical outcome. • Cyclops lesions developed within the first 6 months after surgery. • The size of cyclops lesions did not significantly change over a period of 2 years.

AB - Objectives: To assess the impact of cyclops lesions with MRI in patients treated for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears on clinical outcome. Methods: In 113 patients (age 29.8 ± 10.5y; 55 females; BMI 24.8 ± 3.7 kg/m2) with complete ACL tear, 3 T-MRI scans were obtained before, 6-months, 1-year (n = 75) and 2-years (n = 33) after ACL reconstruction. Presence and volume of cyclops lesions were assessed. Clinical outcomes were measured using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and differences between time points (∆KOOS) were calculated. Changes of KOOS subscales were compared between patients with and without cyclops lesion. KOOS was also correlated with lesion volume. Results: Cyclops lesions were found in 25% (28/113), 27% (20/75) and 33% (11/33) of patients after 6-months, 1- and 2-years, respectively. The lesion volume did not change significantly (P > 0.05) between time points, measuring 0.65 ± 0.59, 0.81 ± 0.70 and 0.72.9 ± 0.96 cm3, respectively. Clinical outcomes based on KOOS subscales were not significantly different in patients with cyclops lesions compared to those without cyclops lesions (each comparison P > 0.05), and no significant associations of clinical outcomes with lesion volume were found (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Neither presence nor size of cyclops lesions within the first 2-years after ACL surgery were associated with inferior clinical outcome. Key Points: • Cyclops lesions had a prevalence of 25% in patients after ACL reconstruction. • Subjects with cyclops lesions did not have an inferior clinical outcome. • Cyclops lesions developed within the first 6 months after surgery. • The size of cyclops lesions did not significantly change over a period of 2 years.

KW - Anterior cruciate ligament tear

KW - Clinical outcome

KW - Cyclops lesions

KW - KOOS score

KW - MRI

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DO - 10.1007/s00330-016-4661-3

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JO - European Radiology

JF - European Radiology

SN - 0938-7994

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