Curricular revision and reform: The process, what was important, and lessons learned

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Beginning in 2005, the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program at the University of California underwent major curricular review and reform. To provide information for others that follow, we have documented our process and commented on factors that were critical to success, as well as factors we found surprising, difficult, or problematic. The review and reform were initiated by the Executive Committee, who led the process and commissioned the committees. The planning stage took 6 years and involved four faculty committees, while the implementation stage took 5 years and was led by the Curriculum Committee. We are now in year 2 of the institutionalizing stage and no longer refer to our reform as the ''new curriculum.'' The change was driven by a desire to improve the curriculum and the learning environment of the students by aligning the delivery of information with current teaching methodologies and implementing adult learning strategies. We moved from a department-and discipline-based curriculum to a school-wide integrated block curriculum that emphasized student-centered, inquiry-based learning. A limit was placed on in-class time to allow students to apply classroom knowledge by solving problems and cases. We found the journey long and arduous, requiring tremendous commitment and effort. In the change process, we learned the importance of adequate planning, leadership, communication, and a reward structure for those doing the ''heavy lifting.'' Specific to our curricular design, we learned the importance of the block leader role, of setting clear expectations for students, and of partnering with students on the journey.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)480-489
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Veterinary Medical Education
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Keywords

  • Reform
  • Renewal
  • Revision
  • Veterinary curriculum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • veterinary(all)

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