Curricular reform of the 4th year of medical school: The colleges model

Stuart J. Slavin, Michael S Wilkes, Richard P. Usatine, Jerome R. Hoffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The practice of medicine has changed dramatically over the last 3 decades. Medical education has struggled to keep up with these changes, with only limited success. The 4th year of medical school offers a tremendous opportunity for curricular innovation, but little change has occurred in the past 30 years. Description: This article traces the history of the 4th year, from the Flexnerian era in which the classic preclinical-clinical model for medical education was developed, through the 1970s, when virtually every medical school adopted a largely elective 4th year, to the present. Although the classic 4th-year curriculum has a number of strengths such as flexibility and relative autonomy of scheduling for students, it also has significant weaknesses. Evaluation: A major educational initiative for the 4th year - the "College Phase" - has been implemented at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. It is designed to remedy many of the weaknesses of the 4th-year curriculum while preserving the benefits. Conclusion: Five colleges have been created: acute care, applied anatomy, medical science, primary care, and urban underserved. Students participate in a number of different college-specific activities that are hoped to produce a more engaging, rigorous, and enriching experience for students and faculty alike.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)186-193
Number of pages8
JournalTeaching and Learning in Medicine
Volume15
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Medical Schools
Students
Medical Education
Curriculum
reform
Medicine
medicine
school
curriculum
student
remedies
scheduling
Primary Health Care
Anatomy
education
flexibility
autonomy
History
innovation
present

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Curricular reform of the 4th year of medical school : The colleges model. / Slavin, Stuart J.; Wilkes, Michael S; Usatine, Richard P.; Hoffman, Jerome R.

In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine, Vol. 15, No. 3, 06.2003, p. 186-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Slavin, SJ, Wilkes, MS, Usatine, RP & Hoffman, JR 2003, 'Curricular reform of the 4th year of medical school: The colleges model', Teaching and Learning in Medicine, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 186-193.
Slavin, Stuart J. ; Wilkes, Michael S ; Usatine, Richard P. ; Hoffman, Jerome R. / Curricular reform of the 4th year of medical school : The colleges model. In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine. 2003 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 186-193.
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