Current trends in autoimmunity and the nervous system

Carlo Selmi, Jobert G. Barin, Noel R. Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the broad field of autoimmunity and clinical immunology, experimental evidence over the past few years have demonstrated several connections between the immune system and the nervous system, both central and peripheral, leading to the definition of neuroimmunology and of an immune-brain axis. Indeed, the central nervous system as an immune-privileged site, thanks to the blood-brain barrier, is no longer a dogma as the barrier may be altered during chronic inflammation with disruptive changes of endothelial cells and tight junctions, largely mediated by adenosine receptors and the expression of CD39/CD73. The diseases that encompass the neuroimmunology field vary from primary nervous diseases such as multiple sclerosis to systemic conditions with neuropsychiatric complications, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or vasculitidies. Despite potentially similar clinical manifestations, the pathogenesis of each condition is different, but the interaction between the ultra-specialized structure that is the nervous system and inflammation mediators are crucial. Two examples come from anti-dsDNA cross-reacting with anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in neuropsychiatric lupus or the new family of antibody-associated neuronal autoimmune diseases including classic paraneoplastic syndromes with antibodies directed to intracellular antigens (Hu, Yo, Ri) and autoimmune encephalitis. In the case of multiple sclerosis, the T cell paradigm is now complicated by the growing evidence of a B cell involvement, particularly via aquaporin antibodies, and their influence on Th1 and Th17 lineages. Inspired by a productive AARDA-sponsored colloquium among experts we provide a critical review of the literature on the pathogenesis of different immune-mediated diseases with neurologic manifestations and we discuss the basic immunology of the central nervous system and the interaction between immune cells and the peripheral nervous system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-29
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Autoimmunity
Volume75
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Autoimmunity
Nervous System
Central Nervous System
Antibodies
Peripheral Nervous System
Allergy and Immunology
Multiple Sclerosis
ELAV Proteins
Paraneoplastic Syndromes
Inflammation Mediators
Aquaporins
Purinergic P1 Receptors
Intercellular Junctions
Tight Junctions
Immune System Diseases
Neurologic Manifestations
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Blood-Brain Barrier
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Autoimmune Diseases

Keywords

  • Autoantibody
  • Autoimmune encephalitis
  • Central nervous system
  • Demyelination
  • Immune tolerance
  • Multiple sclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Current trends in autoimmunity and the nervous system. / Selmi, Carlo; Barin, Jobert G.; Rose, Noel R.

In: Journal of Autoimmunity, Vol. 75, 01.12.2016, p. 20-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Selmi, Carlo ; Barin, Jobert G. ; Rose, Noel R. / Current trends in autoimmunity and the nervous system. In: Journal of Autoimmunity. 2016 ; Vol. 75. pp. 20-29.
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