Current thoughts on maternal nutrition and fetal programming of the metabolic syndrome.

Bonnie Brenseke, M. Renee Prater, Javiera Bahamonde, Juan claudio Gutierrez

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Although the metabolic syndrome has been defined in various ways, the ultimate importance of recognizing this combination of disorders is that it helps identify individuals at high risk for both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Evidence from observational and experimental studies links adverse exposures in early life, particularly relating to nutrition, to chronic disease susceptibility in adulthood. Such studies provide the foundation and framework for the relatively new field of developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD). Although great strides have been made in identifying the putative concepts and mechanisms relating specific exposures in early life to the risk of developing chronic diseases in adulthood, a complete picture remains obscure. To date, the main focus of the field has been on perinatal undernutrition and specific nutrient deficiencies; however, the current global health crisis of overweight and obesity demands that perinatal overnutrition and specific nutrient excesses be examined. This paper assembles current thoughts on the concepts and mechanisms behind the DOHaD as they relate to maternal nutrition, and highlights specific contributions made by macro- and micronutrients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalJournal of Pregnancy
Volume2013
StatePublished - May 31 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Fetal Development
Chronic Disease
Mothers
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Cardiovascular Diseases
Overnutrition
Food
Micronutrients
Disease Susceptibility
Health
Malnutrition
Observational Studies
Cause of Death
Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Current thoughts on maternal nutrition and fetal programming of the metabolic syndrome. / Brenseke, Bonnie; Prater, M. Renee; Bahamonde, Javiera; Gutierrez, Juan claudio.

In: Journal of Pregnancy, Vol. 2013, 31.05.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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