Cultural differences in acceptability of a vaginal microbicide

A comparison between potential users from nashville, tennessee, usa, and kafue and mumbwa, zambia

Valerie Montgomery Rice, Margaret C. Maimbolwa, Esther Munalula Nkandu, Jacqueline Fleming Hampton, Jae Eun Lee, James Hildreth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We sought to determine the relationship between acceptability of a hypothetical vaginal microbicide, cultural factors, and perceived HIV risk among African-American women in Nashville, TN, USA, and African women in Kafue and Mumbwa, Zambia. Patients and methods: Women in both sites completed a survey. Regression analyses were performed on valid samples (Nashville, 164; Zambia, 101) to determine cultural differences affecting microbicide acceptability. Regression analyses also tested whether individual risk perception affected acceptability. Results: In Zambia, 89.6% of women were willing to use a microbicide versus 81.6% in Nashville (P, 0.0001). One cultural difference is that women in the Zambian cohort viewed risk of HIV infection as distinct from risk of acquiring STIs, with 48% believing they were certain to become infected with AIDS, compared to 4% of Nashville participants. Conclusion: These results suggest a high degree of acceptability toward use of a vaginal microbicide to prevent HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-80
Number of pages8
JournalHIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

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Zambia
Anti-Infective Agents
HIV Infections
Regression Analysis
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
African Americans
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV

Keywords

  • Birth control
  • Hiv/aids
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology
  • Health Policy
  • Epidemiology
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Cultural differences in acceptability of a vaginal microbicide : A comparison between potential users from nashville, tennessee, usa, and kafue and mumbwa, zambia. / Rice, Valerie Montgomery; Maimbolwa, Margaret C.; Nkandu, Esther Munalula; Hampton, Jacqueline Fleming; Lee, Jae Eun; Hildreth, James.

In: HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care, Vol. 4, 2012, p. 73-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rice, Valerie Montgomery ; Maimbolwa, Margaret C. ; Nkandu, Esther Munalula ; Hampton, Jacqueline Fleming ; Lee, Jae Eun ; Hildreth, James. / Cultural differences in acceptability of a vaginal microbicide : A comparison between potential users from nashville, tennessee, usa, and kafue and mumbwa, zambia. In: HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care. 2012 ; Vol. 4. pp. 73-80.
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