Cross-talk between site-specific transcription factors and DNA methylation states

Adam Blattler, Peggy J. Farnham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

DNA methylation, which occurs predominantly at CpG dinucleotides, is a potent epigenetic repressor of transcription. BecauseDNAmethylation is reversible, there ismuchinterest in understanding the mechanisms by which it can be regulated by DNA-binding transcription factors. We discuss several models that, by incorporating sequence motifs, CpG density, and methylation levels, attempt to link the binding of a transcription factor with the acquisition or loss of DNA methylation at promoters and distal regulatory elements. Additional in vivo genome-wide characterization of transcription factor binding patterns and high-resolution DNA methylation analyses are clearly required for stronger support of each model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34287-34294
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume288
Issue number48
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 29 2013
Externally publishedYes

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DNA Methylation
Transcription Factors
Methylation
Transcription
Epigenomics
Genes
Genome
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Cross-talk between site-specific transcription factors and DNA methylation states. / Blattler, Adam; Farnham, Peggy J.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 288, No. 48, 29.11.2013, p. 34287-34294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blattler, Adam ; Farnham, Peggy J. / Cross-talk between site-specific transcription factors and DNA methylation states. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2013 ; Vol. 288, No. 48. pp. 34287-34294.
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