Cost-effectiveness analysis of a patient-centered care model for management of psoriasis

Kory Parsi, Cynthia Chambers, April W. Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Cost-effectiveness analyses help policymakers make informed decisions regarding funding allocation of health care resources. Cost-effectiveness analysis of technology-enabled models of health care delivery is necessary to assess sustainability of novel online, patient-centered health care models. Objective: We sought to compare cost-effectiveness of conventional in-office care with a patient-centered, online model for follow-up treatment of patients with psoriasis. Methods: Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from a societal perspective on a randomized controlled trial comparing a patient-centered online model with in-office visits for treatment of patients with psoriasis during a 24-week period. Quality-adjusted life expectancy was calculated using the life table method. Costs were generated from the original study parameters and national averages for salaries and services. Results: No significant difference existed in the mean change in Dermatology Life Quality Index scores between the two groups (online: 3.51 ± 4.48 and in-office: 3.88 ± 6.65, P value =.79). Mean improvement in quality-adjusted life expectancy was not significantly different between the groups (P value =.93), with a gain of 0.447 ± 0.48 quality-adjusted life years for the online group and a gain of 0.463 ± 0.815 quality-adjusted life years for the in-office group. The cost of follow-up psoriasis care with online visits was 1.7 times less than the cost of in-person visits ($315 vs $576). Limitations: Variations in travel time existed among patients depending on their distance from the dermatologist's office. Conclusion: From a societal perspective, the patient-centered online care model appears to be cost saving, while maintaining similar effectiveness to standard in-office care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)563-570
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume66
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

Fingerprint

Patient-Centered Care
Psoriasis
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Quality of Life
Life Expectancy
Delivery of Health Care
Office Visits
Aftercare
Life Tables
Health Resources
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Dermatology
Randomized Controlled Trials
Technology
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • asynchronous teledermatology
  • cost-benefit analysis
  • cost-effectiveness analysis
  • cost-utility analysis
  • e-health
  • e-medicine
  • psoriasis
  • store-and-forward teledermatology
  • teledermatology
  • telemedicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Cost-effectiveness analysis of a patient-centered care model for management of psoriasis. / Parsi, Kory; Chambers, Cynthia; Armstrong, April W.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. 66, No. 4, 04.2012, p. 563-570.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parsi, Kory ; Chambers, Cynthia ; Armstrong, April W. / Cost-effectiveness analysis of a patient-centered care model for management of psoriasis. In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 2012 ; Vol. 66, No. 4. pp. 563-570.
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