Cortisol response to behavior problems in FMR1 premutation mothers of adolescents and adults with fragile X syndrome: A diathesis-stress model

Sigan L. Hartley, Marsha Mailick Seltzer, Jinkuk Hong, Jan S. Greenberg, Leann Smith, David Almeida, Chris Coe, Leonard J Abbeduto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mothers of adolescents and adults with fragile X syndrome (FXS) are faced with high levels of parenting stress. The extent to which mothers are negatively impacted by this stress, however, may be influenced by their own genetic status. The present study uses a diathesis-stress model to examine the ways in which a genetic vulnerability in mothers with the premutation of the FMR1 gene interacts with child-related environmental stress to predict their morning cortisol levels. Seventy-six mothers of an adolescent or adult with FXS participated in an 8-day telephone diary study in which they reported on the behavior problems of their son or daughter with FXS each day. We analyzed salivary cortisol collected from mothers at awakening and 30 minutes after awakening on 4 of these days. The results indicated that mothers with greater genetic vulnerability had a lower level of cortisol on mornings following days when their son or daughter with FXS manifested more episodes of behavior problems, whereas mothers with less genetic risk evinced the opposite pattern of higher morning cortisol in response to their child's behavior problems. This finding contributes to our understanding of gene-by-environment interactions and highlights the importance of interventions to alleviate parenting stress in mothers raising children with FXS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-61
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Development
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fragile X Syndrome
Disease Susceptibility
Hydrocortisone
Mothers
adolescent
Nuclear Family
Parenting
vulnerability
Gene-Environment Interaction
Problem Behavior
Child Behavior
Telephone
telephone

Keywords

  • Cortisol
  • Fragile X syndrome
  • Parenting stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Cortisol response to behavior problems in FMR1 premutation mothers of adolescents and adults with fragile X syndrome : A diathesis-stress model. / Hartley, Sigan L.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Hong, Jinkuk; Greenberg, Jan S.; Smith, Leann; Almeida, David; Coe, Chris; Abbeduto, Leonard J.

In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 53-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hartley, Sigan L. ; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick ; Hong, Jinkuk ; Greenberg, Jan S. ; Smith, Leann ; Almeida, David ; Coe, Chris ; Abbeduto, Leonard J. / Cortisol response to behavior problems in FMR1 premutation mothers of adolescents and adults with fragile X syndrome : A diathesis-stress model. In: International Journal of Behavioral Development. 2012 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 53-61.
@article{78875fec86ee40ceb196456b80ee3631,
title = "Cortisol response to behavior problems in FMR1 premutation mothers of adolescents and adults with fragile X syndrome: A diathesis-stress model",
abstract = "Mothers of adolescents and adults with fragile X syndrome (FXS) are faced with high levels of parenting stress. The extent to which mothers are negatively impacted by this stress, however, may be influenced by their own genetic status. The present study uses a diathesis-stress model to examine the ways in which a genetic vulnerability in mothers with the premutation of the FMR1 gene interacts with child-related environmental stress to predict their morning cortisol levels. Seventy-six mothers of an adolescent or adult with FXS participated in an 8-day telephone diary study in which they reported on the behavior problems of their son or daughter with FXS each day. We analyzed salivary cortisol collected from mothers at awakening and 30 minutes after awakening on 4 of these days. The results indicated that mothers with greater genetic vulnerability had a lower level of cortisol on mornings following days when their son or daughter with FXS manifested more episodes of behavior problems, whereas mothers with less genetic risk evinced the opposite pattern of higher morning cortisol in response to their child's behavior problems. This finding contributes to our understanding of gene-by-environment interactions and highlights the importance of interventions to alleviate parenting stress in mothers raising children with FXS.",
keywords = "Cortisol, Fragile X syndrome, Parenting stress",
author = "Hartley, {Sigan L.} and Seltzer, {Marsha Mailick} and Jinkuk Hong and Greenberg, {Jan S.} and Leann Smith and David Almeida and Chris Coe and Abbeduto, {Leonard J}",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0165025411406857",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "53--61",
journal = "International Journal of Behavioral Development",
issn = "0165-0254",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cortisol response to behavior problems in FMR1 premutation mothers of adolescents and adults with fragile X syndrome

T2 - A diathesis-stress model

AU - Hartley, Sigan L.

AU - Seltzer, Marsha Mailick

AU - Hong, Jinkuk

AU - Greenberg, Jan S.

AU - Smith, Leann

AU - Almeida, David

AU - Coe, Chris

AU - Abbeduto, Leonard J

PY - 2012/1

Y1 - 2012/1

N2 - Mothers of adolescents and adults with fragile X syndrome (FXS) are faced with high levels of parenting stress. The extent to which mothers are negatively impacted by this stress, however, may be influenced by their own genetic status. The present study uses a diathesis-stress model to examine the ways in which a genetic vulnerability in mothers with the premutation of the FMR1 gene interacts with child-related environmental stress to predict their morning cortisol levels. Seventy-six mothers of an adolescent or adult with FXS participated in an 8-day telephone diary study in which they reported on the behavior problems of their son or daughter with FXS each day. We analyzed salivary cortisol collected from mothers at awakening and 30 minutes after awakening on 4 of these days. The results indicated that mothers with greater genetic vulnerability had a lower level of cortisol on mornings following days when their son or daughter with FXS manifested more episodes of behavior problems, whereas mothers with less genetic risk evinced the opposite pattern of higher morning cortisol in response to their child's behavior problems. This finding contributes to our understanding of gene-by-environment interactions and highlights the importance of interventions to alleviate parenting stress in mothers raising children with FXS.

AB - Mothers of adolescents and adults with fragile X syndrome (FXS) are faced with high levels of parenting stress. The extent to which mothers are negatively impacted by this stress, however, may be influenced by their own genetic status. The present study uses a diathesis-stress model to examine the ways in which a genetic vulnerability in mothers with the premutation of the FMR1 gene interacts with child-related environmental stress to predict their morning cortisol levels. Seventy-six mothers of an adolescent or adult with FXS participated in an 8-day telephone diary study in which they reported on the behavior problems of their son or daughter with FXS each day. We analyzed salivary cortisol collected from mothers at awakening and 30 minutes after awakening on 4 of these days. The results indicated that mothers with greater genetic vulnerability had a lower level of cortisol on mornings following days when their son or daughter with FXS manifested more episodes of behavior problems, whereas mothers with less genetic risk evinced the opposite pattern of higher morning cortisol in response to their child's behavior problems. This finding contributes to our understanding of gene-by-environment interactions and highlights the importance of interventions to alleviate parenting stress in mothers raising children with FXS.

KW - Cortisol

KW - Fragile X syndrome

KW - Parenting stress

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84863393608&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84863393608&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0165025411406857

DO - 10.1177/0165025411406857

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84863393608

VL - 36

SP - 53

EP - 61

JO - International Journal of Behavioral Development

JF - International Journal of Behavioral Development

SN - 0165-0254

IS - 1

ER -