Correlation between transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and regional cerebral blood flow in experimental intracranial hypertension

H. Nagai, K. Moritake, M. Takaya, Jan Paul Muizelaar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) provides useful information on cerebral circulation even under raised intracranial pressure. This study was designed to evaluate the correlation between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and TCD parameters under conditions of boundary intracranial hypertension that can cause brain death. Methods: Intracranial pressure was raised by inflation of a supratentorial epidural balloon in cats. Blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery was measured transorbitally with microvascular Doppler sonography, and intracranial pressure and CBF were evaluated. Results: In this study, four characteristic flow patterns were observed, appearing in the following order with progressive increases in intracranial pressure: sharp wave, systolic flow, systolic spike, and no flow. These flow patterns showed a significant correlation with flow velocity, CBF, the pulsatility index, and cerebral perfusion pressure. The systolic-spike and no-flow patterns and pulsatility index over 4.0 indicated decreased CBF, under 10% of control values. Conclusions: The critical level of brain circulation can be detected by Doppler sonography, indicating that TCD is available as a tool for the assessment of cerebral circulatory arrest in brain death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)603-608
Number of pages6
JournalStroke
Volume28
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • brain death
  • cats
  • cerebral blood flow
  • intracranial pressure
  • ultrasonics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Neuroscience(all)

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