Correlation between changes in apparent diffusion coefficient and induction of heat shock protein, cell-specific injury marker expression, and protein synthesis reduction on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images after temporary focal cerebral ischemia in rats

Yasuaki Kokubo, Gerald B. Matson, Jialing Liu, Anthony Mancuso, Takamasa Kayama, Frank R Sharp, Philip R. Weinstein

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Abstract

Object. The authors investigated the relationship between the time course of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) changes and stress protein induction, ischemic neuroglial damage, and cerebral protein synthesis (CPS) after temporary focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Methods. In Group I, ADC changes were measured on magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained during the second half of a 1-hour middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, during a 1-hour reperfusion, and after 23 hours of reperfusion in rats. Immunohistochemical studies for heat shock protein (hsp) 70, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal nuclear (NeuN) protein were performed. In Group II, CPS was assessed using autoradiographic studies obtained after occlusion. At 36 minutes of occlusion, MR imaging demonstrated significantly less ADC reduction in the frontoparietal cortex (82 ± 9% of the contralateral hemisphere) than in the striatum (64 ± 11%; p < 0.05). After 1 hour of reperfusion, the lesion resolved and the difference between cortex and striatum was no longer evident. After 23 hours of reperfusion, the ADC lesion recurred in striatum (76 ± 12%) compared with frontoparietal cortex (100 ± 11%; p < 0.05). Immunohistochemical studies showed hsp 70 expression and an increased GFAP reactivity localized in the frontoparietal cortex of the ischemic hemisphere, along with a significant drop in striatal NeuN immunoreactivity. A trend toward greater reduction in striatal CPS (53 ± 15%) than in frontoparietal cortex CPS (78 ± 23%) was also observed. Conclusions. Sequential ADC maps correlate with the expression of neuroglial stress and injury markers after temporary focal ischemia in rats, distinguishing the striatum (infarct core) from the cortex (ischemic penumbra). A greater reduction in striatal CPS further supports the conclusion that the striatum is more susceptible to temporary MCA occlusion than the cortex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1084-1093
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume96
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Heat-Shock Proteins
Brain Ischemia
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Corpus Striatum
Reperfusion
Wounds and Injuries
HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein
Proteins
Nuclear Proteins
Cerebral Cortex
Ischemia
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Apparent diffusion coefficient
  • Neocortex
  • Neuronal nuclear protein
  • Rat
  • Striatum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

@article{7f6505d330b54b458e37778f0776145c,
title = "Correlation between changes in apparent diffusion coefficient and induction of heat shock protein, cell-specific injury marker expression, and protein synthesis reduction on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images after temporary focal cerebral ischemia in rats",
abstract = "Object. The authors investigated the relationship between the time course of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) changes and stress protein induction, ischemic neuroglial damage, and cerebral protein synthesis (CPS) after temporary focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Methods. In Group I, ADC changes were measured on magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained during the second half of a 1-hour middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, during a 1-hour reperfusion, and after 23 hours of reperfusion in rats. Immunohistochemical studies for heat shock protein (hsp) 70, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal nuclear (NeuN) protein were performed. In Group II, CPS was assessed using autoradiographic studies obtained after occlusion. At 36 minutes of occlusion, MR imaging demonstrated significantly less ADC reduction in the frontoparietal cortex (82 ± 9{\%} of the contralateral hemisphere) than in the striatum (64 ± 11{\%}; p < 0.05). After 1 hour of reperfusion, the lesion resolved and the difference between cortex and striatum was no longer evident. After 23 hours of reperfusion, the ADC lesion recurred in striatum (76 ± 12{\%}) compared with frontoparietal cortex (100 ± 11{\%}; p < 0.05). Immunohistochemical studies showed hsp 70 expression and an increased GFAP reactivity localized in the frontoparietal cortex of the ischemic hemisphere, along with a significant drop in striatal NeuN immunoreactivity. A trend toward greater reduction in striatal CPS (53 ± 15{\%}) than in frontoparietal cortex CPS (78 ± 23{\%}) was also observed. Conclusions. Sequential ADC maps correlate with the expression of neuroglial stress and injury markers after temporary focal ischemia in rats, distinguishing the striatum (infarct core) from the cortex (ischemic penumbra). A greater reduction in striatal CPS further supports the conclusion that the striatum is more susceptible to temporary MCA occlusion than the cortex.",
keywords = "Apparent diffusion coefficient, Neocortex, Neuronal nuclear protein, Rat, Striatum",
author = "Yasuaki Kokubo and Matson, {Gerald B.} and Jialing Liu and Anthony Mancuso and Takamasa Kayama and Sharp, {Frank R} and Weinstein, {Philip R.}",
year = "2002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "96",
pages = "1084--1093",
journal = "Journal of Neurosurgery",
issn = "0022-3085",
publisher = "American Association of Neurological Surgeons",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Correlation between changes in apparent diffusion coefficient and induction of heat shock protein, cell-specific injury marker expression, and protein synthesis reduction on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images after temporary focal cerebral ischemia in rats

AU - Kokubo, Yasuaki

AU - Matson, Gerald B.

AU - Liu, Jialing

AU - Mancuso, Anthony

AU - Kayama, Takamasa

AU - Sharp, Frank R

AU - Weinstein, Philip R.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Object. The authors investigated the relationship between the time course of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) changes and stress protein induction, ischemic neuroglial damage, and cerebral protein synthesis (CPS) after temporary focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Methods. In Group I, ADC changes were measured on magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained during the second half of a 1-hour middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, during a 1-hour reperfusion, and after 23 hours of reperfusion in rats. Immunohistochemical studies for heat shock protein (hsp) 70, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal nuclear (NeuN) protein were performed. In Group II, CPS was assessed using autoradiographic studies obtained after occlusion. At 36 minutes of occlusion, MR imaging demonstrated significantly less ADC reduction in the frontoparietal cortex (82 ± 9% of the contralateral hemisphere) than in the striatum (64 ± 11%; p < 0.05). After 1 hour of reperfusion, the lesion resolved and the difference between cortex and striatum was no longer evident. After 23 hours of reperfusion, the ADC lesion recurred in striatum (76 ± 12%) compared with frontoparietal cortex (100 ± 11%; p < 0.05). Immunohistochemical studies showed hsp 70 expression and an increased GFAP reactivity localized in the frontoparietal cortex of the ischemic hemisphere, along with a significant drop in striatal NeuN immunoreactivity. A trend toward greater reduction in striatal CPS (53 ± 15%) than in frontoparietal cortex CPS (78 ± 23%) was also observed. Conclusions. Sequential ADC maps correlate with the expression of neuroglial stress and injury markers after temporary focal ischemia in rats, distinguishing the striatum (infarct core) from the cortex (ischemic penumbra). A greater reduction in striatal CPS further supports the conclusion that the striatum is more susceptible to temporary MCA occlusion than the cortex.

AB - Object. The authors investigated the relationship between the time course of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) changes and stress protein induction, ischemic neuroglial damage, and cerebral protein synthesis (CPS) after temporary focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Methods. In Group I, ADC changes were measured on magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained during the second half of a 1-hour middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, during a 1-hour reperfusion, and after 23 hours of reperfusion in rats. Immunohistochemical studies for heat shock protein (hsp) 70, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal nuclear (NeuN) protein were performed. In Group II, CPS was assessed using autoradiographic studies obtained after occlusion. At 36 minutes of occlusion, MR imaging demonstrated significantly less ADC reduction in the frontoparietal cortex (82 ± 9% of the contralateral hemisphere) than in the striatum (64 ± 11%; p < 0.05). After 1 hour of reperfusion, the lesion resolved and the difference between cortex and striatum was no longer evident. After 23 hours of reperfusion, the ADC lesion recurred in striatum (76 ± 12%) compared with frontoparietal cortex (100 ± 11%; p < 0.05). Immunohistochemical studies showed hsp 70 expression and an increased GFAP reactivity localized in the frontoparietal cortex of the ischemic hemisphere, along with a significant drop in striatal NeuN immunoreactivity. A trend toward greater reduction in striatal CPS (53 ± 15%) than in frontoparietal cortex CPS (78 ± 23%) was also observed. Conclusions. Sequential ADC maps correlate with the expression of neuroglial stress and injury markers after temporary focal ischemia in rats, distinguishing the striatum (infarct core) from the cortex (ischemic penumbra). A greater reduction in striatal CPS further supports the conclusion that the striatum is more susceptible to temporary MCA occlusion than the cortex.

KW - Apparent diffusion coefficient

KW - Neocortex

KW - Neuronal nuclear protein

KW - Rat

KW - Striatum

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C2 - 12066911

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VL - 96

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EP - 1093

JO - Journal of Neurosurgery

JF - Journal of Neurosurgery

SN - 0022-3085

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