Correlating neurobehavioral performance with biomarkers of organophosphorous pesticide exposure

Diane S. Rohlman, W. Kent Anger, Pamela J Lein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is compelling evidence that adverse neurobehavioral effects are associated with occupational organophosphorous pesticide (OP) exposure in humans. Behavioral studies of pesticide applicators, greenhouse workers, agricultural workers and farm residents exposed repeatedly over months or years to low levels of OPs reveal a relatively consistent pattern of neurobehavioral deficits. However, only two studies have demonstrated a link between neurobehavioral performance and current biomarkers of OP exposure including blood cholinesterase (ChE) activity and urinary levels of OP metabolites. A variety of reasons may explain why so few studies have reported such correlations, including differing individual and group exposure histories, differing methodologies for assessing behavior and exposure, and lack of a reliable index of exposure. Alternatively, these data may suggest that current biomarkers (ChE, urine metabolites) are neither predictive nor diagnostic of the neurobehavioral effects of chronic OP pesticide exposures. This review focuses on the evidence that neurobehavioral performance deficits are associated with occupational OP pesticide exposure and concludes that research needs to return to the basics and rigorously test the relationships between neurobehavioral performance and both current (ChE and urine metabolites) and novel (e.g., inflammation and oxidative stress) biomarkers using human and animal models. The results of such studies are critically important because OP pesticides are widely and extensively used throughout the world, including situations where exposure controls and personal protective equipment are not routinely used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)268-276
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroToxicology
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

Biomarkers
Pesticides
Cholinesterases
Metabolites
Exposure controls
Urine
Applicators
Oxidative stress
Greenhouses
Farms
Animals
Oxidative Stress
Blood
Animal Models
Inflammation

Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • Cholinesterase
  • Neurobehavioral tests
  • OP
  • Organophosphorus pesticides
  • Urine Metabolites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Correlating neurobehavioral performance with biomarkers of organophosphorous pesticide exposure. / Rohlman, Diane S.; Anger, W. Kent; Lein, Pamela J.

In: NeuroToxicology, Vol. 32, No. 2, 03.2011, p. 268-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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