Corneal transplantation for inflammatory keratopathies in the horse: Visual outcome in 206 cases (1993-2007)

D. E. Brooks, C. E. Plummer, M. E. Kallberg, K. P. Barrie, F. J. Ollivier, D. V.H. Hendrix, A. Baker, N. C. Scotty, Mary Utter, S. E. Blackwood, C. M. Nunnery, G. Ben-Shlomo, K. N. Gelatt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To evaluate the visual outcome of three techniques of corneal transplantation surgery in treating severe inflammatory keratopathies in the horse. Design Retrospective medical records study. Animals studied Medical records of 206 horses that received corneal transplantation surgery at the University of Florida Veterinary Medical Center from 1993 to 2007 were reviewed. Procedure Data collected from the medical records included signalment, types of ocular lesions, type of transplant surgery performed, length of follow-up, complications, and visual outcomes. Results Full thickness penetrating keratoplasty (PK) was performed in 86 horses for melting ulcers, iris prolapse/descemetoceles, and medically nonresponsive full thickness stromal abscesses (SA). Posterior lamellar keratoplasty (PLK) and deep lamellar endothelial keratoplasty (DLEK) are split thickness penetrating keratoplasties that were utilized for medically nonresponsive deep stromal abscesses (DSA) in 54 and 66 eyes, respectively. The most common postoperative surgical complication was graft rejection and varying degrees of graft opacification. Wound dehiscence and aqueous humor leakage was also a common postoperative problem. A positive visual outcome was achieved for PK, PLK, and DLEK in 77.9%, 98.1%, and 89.4%, respectively. Conclusions Corneal transplantation is a tectonically viable surgery in the horse with an overall success rate of 88.5% in maintaining vision when treating vascularized and infected corneal disease in the horse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-133
Number of pages11
JournalVeterinary Ophthalmology
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Corneal Transplantation
Horses
horses
Penetrating Keratoplasty
surgery
abscess
Medical Records
surgical transplantation
eyes
corneal diseases
Abscess
iris (eyes)
graft rejection
dehiscence
plant damage
melting
Corneal Diseases
lesions (animal)
Transplants
Aqueous Humor

Keywords

  • Deep endothelial lamellar keratoplasty
  • Horse
  • Keratitis
  • Penetrating keratoplasty
  • Posterior lamellar keratoplasty
  • Stromal abscess

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Brooks, D. E., Plummer, C. E., Kallberg, M. E., Barrie, K. P., Ollivier, F. J., Hendrix, D. V. H., ... Gelatt, K. N. (2008). Corneal transplantation for inflammatory keratopathies in the horse: Visual outcome in 206 cases (1993-2007). Veterinary Ophthalmology, 11(2), 123-133. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1463-5224.2008.00611.x

Corneal transplantation for inflammatory keratopathies in the horse : Visual outcome in 206 cases (1993-2007). / Brooks, D. E.; Plummer, C. E.; Kallberg, M. E.; Barrie, K. P.; Ollivier, F. J.; Hendrix, D. V.H.; Baker, A.; Scotty, N. C.; Utter, Mary; Blackwood, S. E.; Nunnery, C. M.; Ben-Shlomo, G.; Gelatt, K. N.

In: Veterinary Ophthalmology, Vol. 11, No. 2, 01.03.2008, p. 123-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brooks, DE, Plummer, CE, Kallberg, ME, Barrie, KP, Ollivier, FJ, Hendrix, DVH, Baker, A, Scotty, NC, Utter, M, Blackwood, SE, Nunnery, CM, Ben-Shlomo, G & Gelatt, KN 2008, 'Corneal transplantation for inflammatory keratopathies in the horse: Visual outcome in 206 cases (1993-2007)', Veterinary Ophthalmology, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 123-133. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1463-5224.2008.00611.x
Brooks, D. E. ; Plummer, C. E. ; Kallberg, M. E. ; Barrie, K. P. ; Ollivier, F. J. ; Hendrix, D. V.H. ; Baker, A. ; Scotty, N. C. ; Utter, Mary ; Blackwood, S. E. ; Nunnery, C. M. ; Ben-Shlomo, G. ; Gelatt, K. N. / Corneal transplantation for inflammatory keratopathies in the horse : Visual outcome in 206 cases (1993-2007). In: Veterinary Ophthalmology. 2008 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 123-133.
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abstract = "Objective To evaluate the visual outcome of three techniques of corneal transplantation surgery in treating severe inflammatory keratopathies in the horse. Design Retrospective medical records study. Animals studied Medical records of 206 horses that received corneal transplantation surgery at the University of Florida Veterinary Medical Center from 1993 to 2007 were reviewed. Procedure Data collected from the medical records included signalment, types of ocular lesions, type of transplant surgery performed, length of follow-up, complications, and visual outcomes. Results Full thickness penetrating keratoplasty (PK) was performed in 86 horses for melting ulcers, iris prolapse/descemetoceles, and medically nonresponsive full thickness stromal abscesses (SA). Posterior lamellar keratoplasty (PLK) and deep lamellar endothelial keratoplasty (DLEK) are split thickness penetrating keratoplasties that were utilized for medically nonresponsive deep stromal abscesses (DSA) in 54 and 66 eyes, respectively. The most common postoperative surgical complication was graft rejection and varying degrees of graft opacification. Wound dehiscence and aqueous humor leakage was also a common postoperative problem. A positive visual outcome was achieved for PK, PLK, and DLEK in 77.9{\%}, 98.1{\%}, and 89.4{\%}, respectively. Conclusions Corneal transplantation is a tectonically viable surgery in the horse with an overall success rate of 88.5{\%} in maintaining vision when treating vascularized and infected corneal disease in the horse.",
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AU - Kallberg, M. E.

AU - Barrie, K. P.

AU - Ollivier, F. J.

AU - Hendrix, D. V.H.

AU - Baker, A.

AU - Scotty, N. C.

AU - Utter, Mary

AU - Blackwood, S. E.

AU - Nunnery, C. M.

AU - Ben-Shlomo, G.

AU - Gelatt, K. N.

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N2 - Objective To evaluate the visual outcome of three techniques of corneal transplantation surgery in treating severe inflammatory keratopathies in the horse. Design Retrospective medical records study. Animals studied Medical records of 206 horses that received corneal transplantation surgery at the University of Florida Veterinary Medical Center from 1993 to 2007 were reviewed. Procedure Data collected from the medical records included signalment, types of ocular lesions, type of transplant surgery performed, length of follow-up, complications, and visual outcomes. Results Full thickness penetrating keratoplasty (PK) was performed in 86 horses for melting ulcers, iris prolapse/descemetoceles, and medically nonresponsive full thickness stromal abscesses (SA). Posterior lamellar keratoplasty (PLK) and deep lamellar endothelial keratoplasty (DLEK) are split thickness penetrating keratoplasties that were utilized for medically nonresponsive deep stromal abscesses (DSA) in 54 and 66 eyes, respectively. The most common postoperative surgical complication was graft rejection and varying degrees of graft opacification. Wound dehiscence and aqueous humor leakage was also a common postoperative problem. A positive visual outcome was achieved for PK, PLK, and DLEK in 77.9%, 98.1%, and 89.4%, respectively. Conclusions Corneal transplantation is a tectonically viable surgery in the horse with an overall success rate of 88.5% in maintaining vision when treating vascularized and infected corneal disease in the horse.

AB - Objective To evaluate the visual outcome of three techniques of corneal transplantation surgery in treating severe inflammatory keratopathies in the horse. Design Retrospective medical records study. Animals studied Medical records of 206 horses that received corneal transplantation surgery at the University of Florida Veterinary Medical Center from 1993 to 2007 were reviewed. Procedure Data collected from the medical records included signalment, types of ocular lesions, type of transplant surgery performed, length of follow-up, complications, and visual outcomes. Results Full thickness penetrating keratoplasty (PK) was performed in 86 horses for melting ulcers, iris prolapse/descemetoceles, and medically nonresponsive full thickness stromal abscesses (SA). Posterior lamellar keratoplasty (PLK) and deep lamellar endothelial keratoplasty (DLEK) are split thickness penetrating keratoplasties that were utilized for medically nonresponsive deep stromal abscesses (DSA) in 54 and 66 eyes, respectively. The most common postoperative surgical complication was graft rejection and varying degrees of graft opacification. Wound dehiscence and aqueous humor leakage was also a common postoperative problem. A positive visual outcome was achieved for PK, PLK, and DLEK in 77.9%, 98.1%, and 89.4%, respectively. Conclusions Corneal transplantation is a tectonically viable surgery in the horse with an overall success rate of 88.5% in maintaining vision when treating vascularized and infected corneal disease in the horse.

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KW - Keratitis

KW - Penetrating keratoplasty

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KW - Stromal abscess

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