Copper deficiency does not lead to taurine deficiency in rats

Kwang Suk Ko, Cristina L. Tôrres, Andrea J Fascetti, Martha H. Stipanuk, Lawrence Hirschberger, Quinton Rogers

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Abstract

Copper deficiency has been reported to cause a decrease in urinary taurine excretion in rats. We determined whether Cu deficiency would decrease taurine status and the hepatic activities of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and/or cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD) in rats. Ten weanling male rats were assigned to either a Cu-adequate (+Cu) or Cu-deficient (-Cu) group. All rats consumed a Cu-deficient purified diet and water ad-libitum for 16 wk. The water for the +Cu group contained 20 mg Cu/L as CuSO4. At wk 16, the groups differed (P < 0.05) in the following variables (means ± SEM, -Cu vs. +Cu): body weight (BW), 375 ± 19 vs. 418 ± 2.9 g; food intake, 16.2 ± 0.7 vs. 18.5 ± 0.4 g/d; hematocrit, 0.294 ± 0.027 vs. 0.436 ± 0.027; hemoglobin, 95.2 ± 9 vs 134 ± 10 g/L; liver Cu, 8.7 ± 2.0 vs. 65.9 ± 2.5 nmol/g; plasma Cu, 0.38 ± 0.09 vs. 13.4 ± 0.61 μmol/L; plasma ceruloplasmin activity, 1.75 ± 1.0 vs. 67.9 ± 8.4 IU; relative heart weight, 0.56 ± 0.04 vs. 0.35 ± 0.02% BW; relative liver weight, 4.06 ± 0.23 vs. 3.37 ± 0.06% BW; and liver CSAD activity, 18.8 ± 1.37 vs. 13.5 ± 1.11 nmol·min-1·mg protein-1. The groups did not differ at wk 16 in: plasma taurine, 249 ± 14 vs. 298 ± 63 μmol/L; whole blood taurine, 386 ± 32 vs. 390 ± 25 μmol/L; urinary taurine excretion, 82.5 ± 15 vs. 52.0 ± 8.3 μmol/d; liver taurine, 2.6 ± 0.7 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4 μmol/g; liver total glutathione, 6.9 ± 0.48 vs. 6.3 ± 0.40 μmol/g; liver cyst(e)ine, 96 ± 7.1 vs. 99 ± 5.3 nmol/g and liver CDO activity, 2.19 ± 0.33 vs. 2.74 ± 0.21 nmol·min-1·mg protein-1. These findings support the conclusion that Cu deficiency does not affect body taurine status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2502-2505
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume136
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

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    Ko, K. S., Tôrres, C. L., Fascetti, A. J., Stipanuk, M. H., Hirschberger, L., & Rogers, Q. (2006). Copper deficiency does not lead to taurine deficiency in rats. Journal of Nutrition, 136(10), 2502-2505.