Copper deficiency does not lead to taurine deficiency in rats

Kwang Suk Ko, Cristina L. Tôrres, Andrea J Fascetti, Martha H. Stipanuk, Lawrence Hirschberger, Quinton Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Copper deficiency has been reported to cause a decrease in urinary taurine excretion in rats. We determined whether Cu deficiency would decrease taurine status and the hepatic activities of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and/or cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD) in rats. Ten weanling male rats were assigned to either a Cu-adequate (+Cu) or Cu-deficient (-Cu) group. All rats consumed a Cu-deficient purified diet and water ad-libitum for 16 wk. The water for the +Cu group contained 20 mg Cu/L as CuSO4. At wk 16, the groups differed (P < 0.05) in the following variables (means ± SEM, -Cu vs. +Cu): body weight (BW), 375 ± 19 vs. 418 ± 2.9 g; food intake, 16.2 ± 0.7 vs. 18.5 ± 0.4 g/d; hematocrit, 0.294 ± 0.027 vs. 0.436 ± 0.027; hemoglobin, 95.2 ± 9 vs 134 ± 10 g/L; liver Cu, 8.7 ± 2.0 vs. 65.9 ± 2.5 nmol/g; plasma Cu, 0.38 ± 0.09 vs. 13.4 ± 0.61 μmol/L; plasma ceruloplasmin activity, 1.75 ± 1.0 vs. 67.9 ± 8.4 IU; relative heart weight, 0.56 ± 0.04 vs. 0.35 ± 0.02% BW; relative liver weight, 4.06 ± 0.23 vs. 3.37 ± 0.06% BW; and liver CSAD activity, 18.8 ± 1.37 vs. 13.5 ± 1.11 nmol·min-1·mg protein-1. The groups did not differ at wk 16 in: plasma taurine, 249 ± 14 vs. 298 ± 63 μmol/L; whole blood taurine, 386 ± 32 vs. 390 ± 25 μmol/L; urinary taurine excretion, 82.5 ± 15 vs. 52.0 ± 8.3 μmol/d; liver taurine, 2.6 ± 0.7 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4 μmol/g; liver total glutathione, 6.9 ± 0.48 vs. 6.3 ± 0.40 μmol/g; liver cyst(e)ine, 96 ± 7.1 vs. 99 ± 5.3 nmol/g and liver CDO activity, 2.19 ± 0.33 vs. 2.74 ± 0.21 nmol·min-1·mg protein-1. These findings support the conclusion that Cu deficiency does not affect body taurine status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2502-2505
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume136
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2006

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Taurine
taurine
Copper
copper
liver
Liver
rats
sulfoalanine decarboxylase
cysteine
Cysteine Dioxygenase
Body Weight
body weight
excretion
Weights and Measures
ferroxidase
Ceruloplasmin
copper sulfate
Water
acids
weanlings

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Ko, K. S., Tôrres, C. L., Fascetti, A. J., Stipanuk, M. H., Hirschberger, L., & Rogers, Q. (2006). Copper deficiency does not lead to taurine deficiency in rats. Journal of Nutrition, 136(10), 2502-2505.

Copper deficiency does not lead to taurine deficiency in rats. / Ko, Kwang Suk; Tôrres, Cristina L.; Fascetti, Andrea J; Stipanuk, Martha H.; Hirschberger, Lawrence; Rogers, Quinton.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 136, No. 10, 10.2006, p. 2502-2505.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ko, KS, Tôrres, CL, Fascetti, AJ, Stipanuk, MH, Hirschberger, L & Rogers, Q 2006, 'Copper deficiency does not lead to taurine deficiency in rats', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 136, no. 10, pp. 2502-2505.
Ko KS, Tôrres CL, Fascetti AJ, Stipanuk MH, Hirschberger L, Rogers Q. Copper deficiency does not lead to taurine deficiency in rats. Journal of Nutrition. 2006 Oct;136(10):2502-2505.
Ko, Kwang Suk ; Tôrres, Cristina L. ; Fascetti, Andrea J ; Stipanuk, Martha H. ; Hirschberger, Lawrence ; Rogers, Quinton. / Copper deficiency does not lead to taurine deficiency in rats. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2006 ; Vol. 136, No. 10. pp. 2502-2505.
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title = "Copper deficiency does not lead to taurine deficiency in rats",
abstract = "Copper deficiency has been reported to cause a decrease in urinary taurine excretion in rats. We determined whether Cu deficiency would decrease taurine status and the hepatic activities of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and/or cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD) in rats. Ten weanling male rats were assigned to either a Cu-adequate (+Cu) or Cu-deficient (-Cu) group. All rats consumed a Cu-deficient purified diet and water ad-libitum for 16 wk. The water for the +Cu group contained 20 mg Cu/L as CuSO4. At wk 16, the groups differed (P < 0.05) in the following variables (means ± SEM, -Cu vs. +Cu): body weight (BW), 375 ± 19 vs. 418 ± 2.9 g; food intake, 16.2 ± 0.7 vs. 18.5 ± 0.4 g/d; hematocrit, 0.294 ± 0.027 vs. 0.436 ± 0.027; hemoglobin, 95.2 ± 9 vs 134 ± 10 g/L; liver Cu, 8.7 ± 2.0 vs. 65.9 ± 2.5 nmol/g; plasma Cu, 0.38 ± 0.09 vs. 13.4 ± 0.61 μmol/L; plasma ceruloplasmin activity, 1.75 ± 1.0 vs. 67.9 ± 8.4 IU; relative heart weight, 0.56 ± 0.04 vs. 0.35 ± 0.02{\%} BW; relative liver weight, 4.06 ± 0.23 vs. 3.37 ± 0.06{\%} BW; and liver CSAD activity, 18.8 ± 1.37 vs. 13.5 ± 1.11 nmol·min-1·mg protein-1. The groups did not differ at wk 16 in: plasma taurine, 249 ± 14 vs. 298 ± 63 μmol/L; whole blood taurine, 386 ± 32 vs. 390 ± 25 μmol/L; urinary taurine excretion, 82.5 ± 15 vs. 52.0 ± 8.3 μmol/d; liver taurine, 2.6 ± 0.7 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4 μmol/g; liver total glutathione, 6.9 ± 0.48 vs. 6.3 ± 0.40 μmol/g; liver cyst(e)ine, 96 ± 7.1 vs. 99 ± 5.3 nmol/g and liver CDO activity, 2.19 ± 0.33 vs. 2.74 ± 0.21 nmol·min-1·mg protein-1. These findings support the conclusion that Cu deficiency does not affect body taurine status.",
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T1 - Copper deficiency does not lead to taurine deficiency in rats

AU - Ko, Kwang Suk

AU - Tôrres, Cristina L.

AU - Fascetti, Andrea J

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AU - Hirschberger, Lawrence

AU - Rogers, Quinton

PY - 2006/10

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N2 - Copper deficiency has been reported to cause a decrease in urinary taurine excretion in rats. We determined whether Cu deficiency would decrease taurine status and the hepatic activities of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and/or cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD) in rats. Ten weanling male rats were assigned to either a Cu-adequate (+Cu) or Cu-deficient (-Cu) group. All rats consumed a Cu-deficient purified diet and water ad-libitum for 16 wk. The water for the +Cu group contained 20 mg Cu/L as CuSO4. At wk 16, the groups differed (P < 0.05) in the following variables (means ± SEM, -Cu vs. +Cu): body weight (BW), 375 ± 19 vs. 418 ± 2.9 g; food intake, 16.2 ± 0.7 vs. 18.5 ± 0.4 g/d; hematocrit, 0.294 ± 0.027 vs. 0.436 ± 0.027; hemoglobin, 95.2 ± 9 vs 134 ± 10 g/L; liver Cu, 8.7 ± 2.0 vs. 65.9 ± 2.5 nmol/g; plasma Cu, 0.38 ± 0.09 vs. 13.4 ± 0.61 μmol/L; plasma ceruloplasmin activity, 1.75 ± 1.0 vs. 67.9 ± 8.4 IU; relative heart weight, 0.56 ± 0.04 vs. 0.35 ± 0.02% BW; relative liver weight, 4.06 ± 0.23 vs. 3.37 ± 0.06% BW; and liver CSAD activity, 18.8 ± 1.37 vs. 13.5 ± 1.11 nmol·min-1·mg protein-1. The groups did not differ at wk 16 in: plasma taurine, 249 ± 14 vs. 298 ± 63 μmol/L; whole blood taurine, 386 ± 32 vs. 390 ± 25 μmol/L; urinary taurine excretion, 82.5 ± 15 vs. 52.0 ± 8.3 μmol/d; liver taurine, 2.6 ± 0.7 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4 μmol/g; liver total glutathione, 6.9 ± 0.48 vs. 6.3 ± 0.40 μmol/g; liver cyst(e)ine, 96 ± 7.1 vs. 99 ± 5.3 nmol/g and liver CDO activity, 2.19 ± 0.33 vs. 2.74 ± 0.21 nmol·min-1·mg protein-1. These findings support the conclusion that Cu deficiency does not affect body taurine status.

AB - Copper deficiency has been reported to cause a decrease in urinary taurine excretion in rats. We determined whether Cu deficiency would decrease taurine status and the hepatic activities of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and/or cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD) in rats. Ten weanling male rats were assigned to either a Cu-adequate (+Cu) or Cu-deficient (-Cu) group. All rats consumed a Cu-deficient purified diet and water ad-libitum for 16 wk. The water for the +Cu group contained 20 mg Cu/L as CuSO4. At wk 16, the groups differed (P < 0.05) in the following variables (means ± SEM, -Cu vs. +Cu): body weight (BW), 375 ± 19 vs. 418 ± 2.9 g; food intake, 16.2 ± 0.7 vs. 18.5 ± 0.4 g/d; hematocrit, 0.294 ± 0.027 vs. 0.436 ± 0.027; hemoglobin, 95.2 ± 9 vs 134 ± 10 g/L; liver Cu, 8.7 ± 2.0 vs. 65.9 ± 2.5 nmol/g; plasma Cu, 0.38 ± 0.09 vs. 13.4 ± 0.61 μmol/L; plasma ceruloplasmin activity, 1.75 ± 1.0 vs. 67.9 ± 8.4 IU; relative heart weight, 0.56 ± 0.04 vs. 0.35 ± 0.02% BW; relative liver weight, 4.06 ± 0.23 vs. 3.37 ± 0.06% BW; and liver CSAD activity, 18.8 ± 1.37 vs. 13.5 ± 1.11 nmol·min-1·mg protein-1. The groups did not differ at wk 16 in: plasma taurine, 249 ± 14 vs. 298 ± 63 μmol/L; whole blood taurine, 386 ± 32 vs. 390 ± 25 μmol/L; urinary taurine excretion, 82.5 ± 15 vs. 52.0 ± 8.3 μmol/d; liver taurine, 2.6 ± 0.7 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4 μmol/g; liver total glutathione, 6.9 ± 0.48 vs. 6.3 ± 0.40 μmol/g; liver cyst(e)ine, 96 ± 7.1 vs. 99 ± 5.3 nmol/g and liver CDO activity, 2.19 ± 0.33 vs. 2.74 ± 0.21 nmol·min-1·mg protein-1. These findings support the conclusion that Cu deficiency does not affect body taurine status.

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