Controlling cell behavior electrically: Current views and future potential

Colin D. McCaig, Ann M. Rajnicek, Bing Song, Min Zhao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

561 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Direct-current (DC) electric fields are present in all developing and regenerating animal tissues, yet their existence and potential impact on tissue repair and development are largely ignored. This is primarily due to ignorance of the phenomenon by most researchers, some technically poor early studies of the effects of applied fields on cells, and widespread misunderstanding of the fundamental concepts that underlie bioelectricity. This review aims to resolve these issues by describing: 7) the historical context of bioelectricity, 2) the fundamental principles of physics and physiology responsible for DC electric fields within cells and tissues, 3) the cellular mechanisms for the effects of small electric fields on cell behavior, and 4) the clinical potential for electric field treatment of damaged tissues such as epithelia and the nervous system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)943-978
Number of pages36
JournalPhysiological Reviews
Volume85
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Physics
Nervous System
Epithelium
Research Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Controlling cell behavior electrically : Current views and future potential. / McCaig, Colin D.; Rajnicek, Ann M.; Song, Bing; Zhao, Min.

In: Physiological Reviews, Vol. 85, No. 3, 07.2005, p. 943-978.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCaig, Colin D. ; Rajnicek, Ann M. ; Song, Bing ; Zhao, Min. / Controlling cell behavior electrically : Current views and future potential. In: Physiological Reviews. 2005 ; Vol. 85, No. 3. pp. 943-978.
@article{cb47b0f7a4c14312afb6522f8f02fea2,
title = "Controlling cell behavior electrically: Current views and future potential",
abstract = "Direct-current (DC) electric fields are present in all developing and regenerating animal tissues, yet their existence and potential impact on tissue repair and development are largely ignored. This is primarily due to ignorance of the phenomenon by most researchers, some technically poor early studies of the effects of applied fields on cells, and widespread misunderstanding of the fundamental concepts that underlie bioelectricity. This review aims to resolve these issues by describing: 7) the historical context of bioelectricity, 2) the fundamental principles of physics and physiology responsible for DC electric fields within cells and tissues, 3) the cellular mechanisms for the effects of small electric fields on cell behavior, and 4) the clinical potential for electric field treatment of damaged tissues such as epithelia and the nervous system.",
author = "McCaig, {Colin D.} and Rajnicek, {Ann M.} and Bing Song and Min Zhao",
year = "2005",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1152/physrev.00020.2004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "85",
pages = "943--978",
journal = "Physiological Reviews",
issn = "0031-9333",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Controlling cell behavior electrically

T2 - Current views and future potential

AU - McCaig, Colin D.

AU - Rajnicek, Ann M.

AU - Song, Bing

AU - Zhao, Min

PY - 2005/7

Y1 - 2005/7

N2 - Direct-current (DC) electric fields are present in all developing and regenerating animal tissues, yet their existence and potential impact on tissue repair and development are largely ignored. This is primarily due to ignorance of the phenomenon by most researchers, some technically poor early studies of the effects of applied fields on cells, and widespread misunderstanding of the fundamental concepts that underlie bioelectricity. This review aims to resolve these issues by describing: 7) the historical context of bioelectricity, 2) the fundamental principles of physics and physiology responsible for DC electric fields within cells and tissues, 3) the cellular mechanisms for the effects of small electric fields on cell behavior, and 4) the clinical potential for electric field treatment of damaged tissues such as epithelia and the nervous system.

AB - Direct-current (DC) electric fields are present in all developing and regenerating animal tissues, yet their existence and potential impact on tissue repair and development are largely ignored. This is primarily due to ignorance of the phenomenon by most researchers, some technically poor early studies of the effects of applied fields on cells, and widespread misunderstanding of the fundamental concepts that underlie bioelectricity. This review aims to resolve these issues by describing: 7) the historical context of bioelectricity, 2) the fundamental principles of physics and physiology responsible for DC electric fields within cells and tissues, 3) the cellular mechanisms for the effects of small electric fields on cell behavior, and 4) the clinical potential for electric field treatment of damaged tissues such as epithelia and the nervous system.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=21244445821&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=21244445821&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1152/physrev.00020.2004

DO - 10.1152/physrev.00020.2004

M3 - Article

C2 - 15987799

AN - SCOPUS:21244445821

VL - 85

SP - 943

EP - 978

JO - Physiological Reviews

JF - Physiological Reviews

SN - 0031-9333

IS - 3

ER -