Contraceptive counseling of diabetic women of reproductive age

Eleanor Schwarz, Judith Maselli, Ralph Gonzales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of diabetes on provision of contraceptive counseling. METHODS: We compared counseling provided to diabetic and nondiabetic women on 40,304 visits made to U.S. ambulatory practices by nonpregnant women, 14-44 years of age, included in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1997-2000. Logistic regression, adjusting for age, race, ethnicity, insurance status, and provider characteristics was used to estimate the relationship between provision of contraceptive counseling and diabetes. RESULTS: Visits made by diabetic women of reproductive age were significantly less likely to include contraceptive counseling than visits made by nondiabetic women of reproductive age (odds ratio [OR] 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.81). Visits made by diabetic women under 25 years of age were less likely to include contraceptive counseling than visits made by older diabetic women (OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.06-0.54). Overall, only 4% of visits made by diabetic women documented contraceptive counseling. When family planning was the primary reason for a visit (OR 34.4, 95% CI 20.8-56.9) or women visited a gynecologist (OR 24.3, 95% CI 16.7-35.2), women were significantly more likely to receive contraceptive counseling. However, diabetic women made only 0.3% of all visits to gynecologists. CONCLUSION: Ambulatory physicians in the United States rarely provide contraceptive counseling to diabetic women. This may contribute to adverse birth outcomes for some diabetic mothers who conceive before optimal glucose control is obtained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1070-1074
Number of pages5
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume107
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Contraceptive Agents
Counseling
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Health Care Surveys
Insurance Coverage
Family Planning Services
Logistic Models
Mothers
Parturition
Physicians
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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Contraceptive counseling of diabetic women of reproductive age. / Schwarz, Eleanor; Maselli, Judith; Gonzales, Ralph.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 107, No. 5, 01.05.2006, p. 1070-1074.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schwarz, Eleanor ; Maselli, Judith ; Gonzales, Ralph. / Contraceptive counseling of diabetic women of reproductive age. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2006 ; Vol. 107, No. 5. pp. 1070-1074.
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