Contact resonance imaging - A simple approach to improve the resolution of AFM for biological and polymeric materials

Kapila Wadu-Mesthrige, Nabil A. Amro, Jayne C. Garno, Sylvain Cruchon-Dupeyrat, Gang-yu Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is frequently observed that high resolution is difficult to achieve when using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image "soft-and-sticky" surfaces, such as polymers and biomaterials. A new and simple method, contact resonance imaging (CRI), is introduced to address these issues. In CRI, the sample is modulated at a resonance frequency of the tip-sample contact, while the average position of the tip still remains in contact with the surface, i.e. in the repulsive region of the force-distance curve. The improvement in image resolution is demonstrated using various biological and polymeric specimens under ambient laboratory conditions and in liquid media. The possible mechanism of the resolution improvement is discussed in comparison to other techniques, such as tapping-mode imaging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-398
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume175-176
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Biological materials
Atomic force microscopy
atomic force microscopy
Imaging techniques
Polymers
image resolution
Biocompatible Materials
Image resolution
Biomaterials
high resolution
polymers
Liquids
curves
liquids

Keywords

  • AFM
  • Contact resonance imaging
  • Nanografting
  • Protein
  • Resolution
  • Self-assembled monolayer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Contact resonance imaging - A simple approach to improve the resolution of AFM for biological and polymeric materials. / Wadu-Mesthrige, Kapila; Amro, Nabil A.; Garno, Jayne C.; Cruchon-Dupeyrat, Sylvain; Liu, Gang-yu.

In: Applied Surface Science, Vol. 175-176, 15.05.2001, p. 391-398.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wadu-Mesthrige, Kapila ; Amro, Nabil A. ; Garno, Jayne C. ; Cruchon-Dupeyrat, Sylvain ; Liu, Gang-yu. / Contact resonance imaging - A simple approach to improve the resolution of AFM for biological and polymeric materials. In: Applied Surface Science. 2001 ; Vol. 175-176. pp. 391-398.
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