Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adiposity and lipids and decreases insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese humans

Kimber Stanhope, Jean Marc Schwarz, Nancy L. Keim, Steven C. Griffen, Andrew A. Bremer, James L. Graham, Bonnie Hatcher, Chad L. Cox, Artem Dyachenko, Wei Zhang, John P McGahan, J Anthony Seibert, Ronald M. Krauss, Sally Chiu, Ernst J. Schaefer, Masumi Ai, Seiko Otokozawa, Katsuyuki Nakajima, Takamitsu Nakano, Carine BeysenMarc K. Hellerstein, Lars Berglund, Peter J Havel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

985 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies in animals have documented that, compared with glucose, dietary fructose induces dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. To assess the relative effects of these dietary sugars during sustained consumption in humans, overweight and obese subjects consumed glucose- or fructose-sweetened beverages providing 25% of energy requirements for 10 weeks. Although both groups exhibited similar weight gain during the intervention, visceral adipose volume was significantly increased only in subjects consuming fructose. Fasting plasma triglyceride concentrations increased by approximately 10% during 10 weeks of glucose consumption but not after fructose consumption. In contrast, hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and the 23-hour postprandial triglyceride AUC were increased specifically during fructose consumption. Similarly, markers of altered lipid metabolism and lipoprotein remodeling, including fasting apoB, LDL, small dense LDL, oxidized LDL, and postprandial concentrations of remnant-like particle-triglyceride and -cholesterol significantly increased during fructose but not glucose consumption. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels increased and insulin sensitivity decreased in subjects consuming fructose but not in those consuming glucose. These data suggest that dietary fructose specifically increases DNL, promotes dyslipidemia, decreases insulin sensitivity, and increases visceral adiposity in overweight/obese adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1322-1334
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume119
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009

Fingerprint

Beverages
Adiposity
Fructose
Insulin Resistance
Lipids
Glucose
Fasting
Lipogenesis
Triglycerides
Dyslipidemias
Dietary Sucrose
Apolipoproteins B
Lipid Metabolism
Lipoproteins
Weight Gain
Area Under Curve
Insulin
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adiposity and lipids and decreases insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese humans. / Stanhope, Kimber; Schwarz, Jean Marc; Keim, Nancy L.; Griffen, Steven C.; Bremer, Andrew A.; Graham, James L.; Hatcher, Bonnie; Cox, Chad L.; Dyachenko, Artem; Zhang, Wei; McGahan, John P; Seibert, J Anthony; Krauss, Ronald M.; Chiu, Sally; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Ai, Masumi; Otokozawa, Seiko; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Takamitsu; Beysen, Carine; Hellerstein, Marc K.; Berglund, Lars; Havel, Peter J.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 119, No. 5, 01.05.2009, p. 1322-1334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stanhope, K, Schwarz, JM, Keim, NL, Griffen, SC, Bremer, AA, Graham, JL, Hatcher, B, Cox, CL, Dyachenko, A, Zhang, W, McGahan, JP, Seibert, JA, Krauss, RM, Chiu, S, Schaefer, EJ, Ai, M, Otokozawa, S, Nakajima, K, Nakano, T, Beysen, C, Hellerstein, MK, Berglund, L & Havel, PJ 2009, 'Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adiposity and lipids and decreases insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese humans', Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 119, no. 5, pp. 1322-1334. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI37385
Stanhope, Kimber ; Schwarz, Jean Marc ; Keim, Nancy L. ; Griffen, Steven C. ; Bremer, Andrew A. ; Graham, James L. ; Hatcher, Bonnie ; Cox, Chad L. ; Dyachenko, Artem ; Zhang, Wei ; McGahan, John P ; Seibert, J Anthony ; Krauss, Ronald M. ; Chiu, Sally ; Schaefer, Ernst J. ; Ai, Masumi ; Otokozawa, Seiko ; Nakajima, Katsuyuki ; Nakano, Takamitsu ; Beysen, Carine ; Hellerstein, Marc K. ; Berglund, Lars ; Havel, Peter J. / Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adiposity and lipids and decreases insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese humans. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2009 ; Vol. 119, No. 5. pp. 1322-1334.
@article{dd9d6805114241dca9aace96262cb2b8,
title = "Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adiposity and lipids and decreases insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese humans",
abstract = "Studies in animals have documented that, compared with glucose, dietary fructose induces dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. To assess the relative effects of these dietary sugars during sustained consumption in humans, overweight and obese subjects consumed glucose- or fructose-sweetened beverages providing 25{\%} of energy requirements for 10 weeks. Although both groups exhibited similar weight gain during the intervention, visceral adipose volume was significantly increased only in subjects consuming fructose. Fasting plasma triglyceride concentrations increased by approximately 10{\%} during 10 weeks of glucose consumption but not after fructose consumption. In contrast, hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and the 23-hour postprandial triglyceride AUC were increased specifically during fructose consumption. Similarly, markers of altered lipid metabolism and lipoprotein remodeling, including fasting apoB, LDL, small dense LDL, oxidized LDL, and postprandial concentrations of remnant-like particle-triglyceride and -cholesterol significantly increased during fructose but not glucose consumption. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels increased and insulin sensitivity decreased in subjects consuming fructose but not in those consuming glucose. These data suggest that dietary fructose specifically increases DNL, promotes dyslipidemia, decreases insulin sensitivity, and increases visceral adiposity in overweight/obese adults.",
author = "Kimber Stanhope and Schwarz, {Jean Marc} and Keim, {Nancy L.} and Griffen, {Steven C.} and Bremer, {Andrew A.} and Graham, {James L.} and Bonnie Hatcher and Cox, {Chad L.} and Artem Dyachenko and Wei Zhang and McGahan, {John P} and Seibert, {J Anthony} and Krauss, {Ronald M.} and Sally Chiu and Schaefer, {Ernst J.} and Masumi Ai and Seiko Otokozawa and Katsuyuki Nakajima and Takamitsu Nakano and Carine Beysen and Hellerstein, {Marc K.} and Lars Berglund and Havel, {Peter J}",
year = "2009",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1172/JCI37385",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "119",
pages = "1322--1334",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Investigation",
issn = "0021-9738",
publisher = "The American Society for Clinical Investigation",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adiposity and lipids and decreases insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese humans

AU - Stanhope, Kimber

AU - Schwarz, Jean Marc

AU - Keim, Nancy L.

AU - Griffen, Steven C.

AU - Bremer, Andrew A.

AU - Graham, James L.

AU - Hatcher, Bonnie

AU - Cox, Chad L.

AU - Dyachenko, Artem

AU - Zhang, Wei

AU - McGahan, John P

AU - Seibert, J Anthony

AU - Krauss, Ronald M.

AU - Chiu, Sally

AU - Schaefer, Ernst J.

AU - Ai, Masumi

AU - Otokozawa, Seiko

AU - Nakajima, Katsuyuki

AU - Nakano, Takamitsu

AU - Beysen, Carine

AU - Hellerstein, Marc K.

AU - Berglund, Lars

AU - Havel, Peter J

PY - 2009/5/1

Y1 - 2009/5/1

N2 - Studies in animals have documented that, compared with glucose, dietary fructose induces dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. To assess the relative effects of these dietary sugars during sustained consumption in humans, overweight and obese subjects consumed glucose- or fructose-sweetened beverages providing 25% of energy requirements for 10 weeks. Although both groups exhibited similar weight gain during the intervention, visceral adipose volume was significantly increased only in subjects consuming fructose. Fasting plasma triglyceride concentrations increased by approximately 10% during 10 weeks of glucose consumption but not after fructose consumption. In contrast, hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and the 23-hour postprandial triglyceride AUC were increased specifically during fructose consumption. Similarly, markers of altered lipid metabolism and lipoprotein remodeling, including fasting apoB, LDL, small dense LDL, oxidized LDL, and postprandial concentrations of remnant-like particle-triglyceride and -cholesterol significantly increased during fructose but not glucose consumption. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels increased and insulin sensitivity decreased in subjects consuming fructose but not in those consuming glucose. These data suggest that dietary fructose specifically increases DNL, promotes dyslipidemia, decreases insulin sensitivity, and increases visceral adiposity in overweight/obese adults.

AB - Studies in animals have documented that, compared with glucose, dietary fructose induces dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. To assess the relative effects of these dietary sugars during sustained consumption in humans, overweight and obese subjects consumed glucose- or fructose-sweetened beverages providing 25% of energy requirements for 10 weeks. Although both groups exhibited similar weight gain during the intervention, visceral adipose volume was significantly increased only in subjects consuming fructose. Fasting plasma triglyceride concentrations increased by approximately 10% during 10 weeks of glucose consumption but not after fructose consumption. In contrast, hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and the 23-hour postprandial triglyceride AUC were increased specifically during fructose consumption. Similarly, markers of altered lipid metabolism and lipoprotein remodeling, including fasting apoB, LDL, small dense LDL, oxidized LDL, and postprandial concentrations of remnant-like particle-triglyceride and -cholesterol significantly increased during fructose but not glucose consumption. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels increased and insulin sensitivity decreased in subjects consuming fructose but not in those consuming glucose. These data suggest that dietary fructose specifically increases DNL, promotes dyslipidemia, decreases insulin sensitivity, and increases visceral adiposity in overweight/obese adults.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=66449093225&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=66449093225&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1172/JCI37385

DO - 10.1172/JCI37385

M3 - Article

C2 - 19381015

AN - SCOPUS:66449093225

VL - 119

SP - 1322

EP - 1334

JO - Journal of Clinical Investigation

JF - Journal of Clinical Investigation

SN - 0021-9738

IS - 5

ER -