Construction of an infectious HIV type 1 molecular clone from an African patient with a subtype D/C recombinant virus

Binshan Shi, Sean M. Philpott, Barbara Weiser, Carla Kuiken, Cheryl Brunner, Guowei Fang, Keith R. Fowke, Francis A. Plummer, Sarah Rowland-Jones, Job Bwayo, Aggrey O. Anzala, Joshua Kimani, Rupert Kaul, Harold Burger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The majority of HIV-1 infections worldwide occur in Africa, where subtype B viruses are rare and intersubtype recombinants are common. Pathogenesis and vaccine studies need to focus on viruses derived from African patients, and infectious HIV-1 molecular clones can be useful tools. To clone non-B subtypes and recombinant viruses from patients, we cultivated HIV-1 from the plasma of a Kenyan long-term survivor. Viral DNA was cloned into a plasmid, which was transfected into COS cells; progeny virus was propagated in PBMCs. Sequence analyses revealed that both the patient's plasma HIV-1 RNA and the cloned DNA genomes were recombinants between subtypes D and C; subtype C sequences comprised the nef and LTR regions. The cloned virus used the CCR5 coreceptor and did not form syncytia in vitro. This infectious HIV-1 subtype D/C recombinant molecular clone obtained from a Kenyan long-term survivor promises to be useful to study pathogenesis and vaccine design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1015-1018
Number of pages4
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume20
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Dilatation and Curettage
HIV-1
Clone Cells
Viruses
Survivors
Vaccines
Cercopithecine Herpesvirus 1
COS Cells
Viral DNA
Giant Cells
HIV Infections
Sequence Analysis
Plasmids
Genome
RNA
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Construction of an infectious HIV type 1 molecular clone from an African patient with a subtype D/C recombinant virus. / Shi, Binshan; Philpott, Sean M.; Weiser, Barbara; Kuiken, Carla; Brunner, Cheryl; Fang, Guowei; Fowke, Keith R.; Plummer, Francis A.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah; Bwayo, Job; Anzala, Aggrey O.; Kimani, Joshua; Kaul, Rupert; Burger, Harold.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 20, No. 9, 09.2004, p. 1015-1018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shi, B, Philpott, SM, Weiser, B, Kuiken, C, Brunner, C, Fang, G, Fowke, KR, Plummer, FA, Rowland-Jones, S, Bwayo, J, Anzala, AO, Kimani, J, Kaul, R & Burger, H 2004, 'Construction of an infectious HIV type 1 molecular clone from an African patient with a subtype D/C recombinant virus', AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, vol. 20, no. 9, pp. 1015-1018. https://doi.org/10.1089/aid.2004.20.1015
Shi, Binshan ; Philpott, Sean M. ; Weiser, Barbara ; Kuiken, Carla ; Brunner, Cheryl ; Fang, Guowei ; Fowke, Keith R. ; Plummer, Francis A. ; Rowland-Jones, Sarah ; Bwayo, Job ; Anzala, Aggrey O. ; Kimani, Joshua ; Kaul, Rupert ; Burger, Harold. / Construction of an infectious HIV type 1 molecular clone from an African patient with a subtype D/C recombinant virus. In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 2004 ; Vol. 20, No. 9. pp. 1015-1018.
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