Consistency and effect of body position change on measurement of upper and lower esophageal sphincter geometry using impedance planimetry in a canine model

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4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The EndoFLIP (Endolumenal Functional Lumen Imaging Probe, Crospon Inc, Galway, Ireland) device uses the technique of impedance planimetry to evaluate dimensions and distensibility of the upper and lower esophageal sphincter. The null hypotheses for this study were that EndoFLIP variables would be stable between anesthestic episodes and would not be affected by body position when evaluating the upper and lower esophageal sphincters in healthy dogs. During each of three consecutive general anesthesia episodes administered to eight healthy adult research colony dogs with a standardized protocol, the EndoFLIP catheter was positioned to measure cross-sectional area, intrabag pressure, upper and lower esophageal sphincter length at two different balloon fill volumes (30 and 40 mL) and two body positions (lateral and dorsal recumbency). From these measured variables, a distensibility index was also calculated. Mixed effect analysis of variance was used to evaluate the fixed marginal and interaction effects of anesthesia episode, body position, and balloon volume on measured and calculated variables. For the upper esophageal sphincter significant interactions were present between anesthetic episode and body position for all variables except intrabag pressure; adjusting for body position significant differences were present between anesthetic episodes for all variables except distensibility index; adjusting for anesthetic episode cross-sectional area, intrabag pressure, upper esophageal sphincter length and distensibility index were all affected by body position. For the lower esophageal sphincter distensibility index was the only variable where a significant interaction between anesthesia episode and body position occurred; cross-sectional area, intrabag pressure, and lower esophageal length were not significantly affected by anesthesia episode when adjusting for body position; distensibility index was the only variable significantly affected by body position. Measurements of the geometry of the lower esophageal sphincter as measured by the EndoFLIP device were consistent under conditions of general anesthesia. Similar measurements taken at the upper esophageal sphincter displayed greater variability between anesthetic episodes and were affected to a greater extent by body position. Body position should be standardized in studies using the EndoFLIP to assess geometric and functional characteristics of the upper and lower esophageal sphincters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalDiseases of the esophagus : official journal of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Keywords

  • esophageal
  • hernia
  • hiatal
  • laparoscopy
  • reflux

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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